Discussion:
More good news for IPhone - 11/16/08 AA offers iPhone mobile boarding passes
(too old to reply)
4phun
2008-11-17 00:49:08 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 11, 1:22 am, Nigel <***@nowhere.com> wrote:
> in article
> bbb0aae2-37e9-44f2-9973-***@h23g2000prf.googlegroups.com, 4phun at
> ***@gmail.com wrote on 11/11/08 1:54 PM:
>
>
>
> > 11/10/08 - Motorola Razr Finally Dethroned!
>
> > IPhone Crowned Top Cell Phone In U.S.
> > and what is even more Amazing Only AT&T Has It!
>
> > By Antone Gonsalves
> > InformationWeek
> > November 10, 2008 08:00 PM
>
> > Apple's iPhone 3G was the best-selling mobile phone in the United
> > States in the third quarter, surpassing former champion theMotorola
> > (NYSE: MOT) Razr, which fell to second place, a market research firm
> > said Monday.
>
> > Nevertheless, the iPhone's popularity among U.S. consumers failed to
> > lift the overall market. Handset purchases overall declined 15% from
> > the same period a year ago to 32 million units, the NPD Group said.
> > Handset revenue fell 10% to $2.9 billion, even though the average
> > selling price rose 6% to $88.
>
> > The Razr was ranked the top-selling consumer handset for 12
> > consecutive quarters. The iPhone's ascension represented a "watershed
> > shift in handset design from fashion to fashionable functionality,"
> > NPD analyst Ross Rubin said in a statement.
>
> >http://www.informationweek.com/news/personal_tech/iphone/showArticle....
> > icleID=212001650
>
> > This report also ran on NPR's
> > All Things Considered 11/10/08
>
> > Poor Verizon, Sprint -
> > No iPhone for you, keep pushing those Razrs ;>)
>
> > On Nov 9, 12:35 am, 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> >> MORE GOOD NEWS FOR IPHONE USERS 11/08/08
>
> >> YOUR IPHONE IS FAR MORE RELIABLE
>
> >> SquareTrade Study: iPhones more reliable than BlackBerry, Treo
>
> >>http://www.blogcdn.com/www.tuaw.com/media/2008/11/malfunctionsmartpho...
>
> >> The report, titled "iPhone More Reliable than BlackBerry, One Year
> >> In", analyzes failure rates for more than 15,000 new cell phones
> >> covered by SquareTrade warranties. SquareTrade found that after one
> >> year of ownership, iPhone owners were half as likely as BlackBerry
> >> owners to have a phone failure, and one-third as likely as Treo
> >> owners.
>
> >> EVEN MORE BREAKING GOOD NEWS FOR IPHONE
>
> >> ANY WEBSITE CAN NOW BE INSTANTLY
> >> IPHONIZEDhttp://digg.com/tech_news/HOW_TO_Instantly_iPhone_ize_Your_Website
>
> >> British developer Jon Wheatley let loose an awesome little tool today:
> >> Intersquash lets you convert any website into an iPhone siteŠ
> >> instantly.
>
> >> Video at link just click through DIGG
>
> No surprise - I hated my RAZR.  Funny to think about the internet experience
> on the RAZR compared to the iPhone - talk about the dark ages.  Long live
> the iphone (until someone makes something even better at least).
>
> Nigel

American Airlines first to offer iPhone mobile boarding passes

In what will no doubt be the first among several who will offer this
(it’s about time!), American Airlines is now the first airline to
officially offer mobile boarding passes at a few airports but it
shouldn’t take long for this to be available at all airports, across
all airlines.

For those who travel frequently, it’s obviously more convenient to
show your iPhone screen rather than looking in your backpack for the
right piece of paper.

Is this the wave of the future? More than likely. American Airlines
started to make this mobile boarding pass option available to people
who travel from Chicago O’Hare Airport, LAX, and John Wayne Airport,
and it is leading the way for all other airlines. More airlines will
probably follow in the near future, and it’s yet another example of
the iPhone’s penetration into the everyday consciousness of business.

This is one of several recent events that could give the iPhone a
commanding lead far over any other cell phone trying to catch Apple.
nospam
2008-11-17 04:50:01 UTC
Permalink
In article
<b81d2067-f1af-4522-b1d9-***@a3g2000prm.googlegroups.com>,
4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:

> American Airlines first to offer iPhone mobile boarding passes

actually they aren't the first. continental has had it for a while and
it isn't just an iphone either.

> For those who travel frequently, itís obviously more convenient to
> show your iPhone screen rather than looking in your backpack for the
> right piece of paper.

it's much easier to show a piece of paper than it is to deal with a
phone which is probably already in a bag for going through the x-ray
machine (can't have it on your person for the metal detector).

the only real advantage is on line check in while traveling and not
having access to a printer, although even that isn't a big deal since
the kiosk will reprint it.

> This is one of several recent events that could give the iPhone a
> commanding lead far over any other cell phone trying to catch Apple.

it's nothing new and it's not iphone specific. long ago, prior to the
requirement to have a boarding pass to enter the secure area, it was
possible to check in via any phone and then show a gold/platinum card
at the gate which the gate agent inserted into the machine and
retrieved the info and printed a boarding pass.
Ron
2008-11-17 09:16:56 UTC
Permalink
Continental Airlines has had Mobile Boarding pass for almost a year
already, so where does AA get off calling themselves first???

http://www.continental.com/web/en-US/apps/onepass/promotions/registrationDetails.aspx?promoCode=A4802
nospam
2008-11-17 09:43:29 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>, Ron
<***@peoplepc.com> wrote:

> Continental Airlines has had Mobile Boarding pass for almost a year
> already, so where does AA get off calling themselves first???

they don't, nor do they mention iphones

<http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/081113/american_airlines_boarding_passes.html>
Ron
2008-11-17 11:38:18 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 17 Nov 2008 04:43:29 -0500, nospam <***@nospam.invalid>
wrote:

>In article <***@4ax.com>, Ron
><***@peoplepc.com> wrote:
>
>> Continental Airlines has had Mobile Boarding pass for almost a year
>> already, so where does AA get off calling themselves first???
>
>they don't, nor do they mention iphones
>
><http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/081113/american_airlines_boarding_passes.html>


Your snipping the link proving Continental did it last year in 2007,
doesnt make AA first.

http://www.continental.com/web/en-US/apps/onepass/promotions/registrationDetails.aspx?promoCode=A4802
Todd Allcock
2008-11-17 16:30:25 UTC
Permalink
"Ron" <***@peoplepc.com> wrote in message
news:***@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 17 Nov 2008 04:43:29 -0500, nospam <***@nospam.invalid>
> wrote:
>
>>In article <***@4ax.com>, Ron
>><***@peoplepc.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Continental Airlines has had Mobile Boarding pass for almost a year
>>> already, so where does AA get off calling themselves first???
>>
>>they don't, nor do they mention iphones
>>
>><http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/081113/american_airlines_boarding_passes.html>
>
>
> Your snipping the link proving Continental did it last year in 2007,
> doesnt make AA first.
>
> http://www.continental.com/web/en-US/apps/onepass/promotions/registrationDetails.aspx?promoCode=A4802

Um, he was SUPPORTING your position, not arguing with you! He merely
pointed out that 4phun's original post was, like most of his rantings,
exaggerated, and provided a link showing that AA's press release did NOT
claim they were first (as 4phun suggested) nor did it say it was for iPhones
only (also as 4phun suggested.)

I guess you're just so used to people arguing with you that you can't
recognize support when you see it!
4phun
2008-11-18 05:04:52 UTC
Permalink
I found and downloaded the voice update to Google Mobile and it is by
far the best update to any app ever at the iTunes store.

FAST
ACCURATE
AND BEYOND EASY TO USE

INSTANT RESULTS CUSTOMIZED FOR THE IPHONE!

This application alone will sell a ton of iPhones this season. It is
that good!

And so far you will only find it on the iPhone at AT&T




To bad, so sad, if you can't have it!

;>)
4phun
2008-11-18 05:10:33 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 18, 12:04 am, 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> I found and downloaded the voice update to Google Mobile and it is by
> far the best update to any app ever at the iTunes store.
>
> FAST
> ACCURATE
> AND BEYOND EASY TO USE
>
> INSTANT RESULTS CUSTOMIZED FOR THE IPHONE!
>
> This application alone will sell a ton of iPhones this season. It is
> that good!
>
> And so far you will only find it on the iPhone at AT&T
>
> To bad, so sad, if you can't have it!
>
> ;>)

MORE


Features

Voice Search.New! Speak your queries without even pushing a single
button.

Search with My Location.New! Search for business, weather, and movie
information without specifying where you are.

Local search suggestions on a map. See nearby business suggestions on
Google Maps -- just tap the "near me" suggestions.

Instant access to search. Start a Google search with just one click.

Google Suggest. Get relevant search suggestions as you type, saving
you keystrokes.

URL suggestions. Get to popular web sites quickly by tapping site web
address suggestions.

Contact search. Quickly find contacts in your address book.

Search history. Get instant access to your previous searches.

Easy access to other Google products. Launch other Google products
like Maps, Gmail and News from the Apps tab.


http://phobos.apple.com/webobjects/mzstore.woa/wa/viewsoftware?id=284815942&mt=8
George Kerby
2008-11-18 17:41:06 UTC
Permalink
On 11/17/08 11:10 PM, in article
5284c053-f7dc-4715-a79f-***@o4g2000pra.googlegroups.com, "4phun"
<***@gmail.com> wrote:

> On Nov 18, 12:04 am, 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>> I found and downloaded the voice update to Google Mobile and it is by
>> far the best update to any app ever at the iTunes store.
>>
>> FAST
>> ACCURATE
>> AND BEYOND EASY TO USE
>>
>> INSTANT RESULTS CUSTOMIZED FOR THE IPHONE!
>>
>> This application alone will sell a ton of iPhones this season. It is
>> that good!
>>
>> And so far you will only find it on the iPhone at AT&T
>>
>> To bad, so sad, if you can't have it!
>>
>> ;>)
>
> MORE
>
>
> Features
>
> Voice Search.New! Speak your queries without even pushing a single
> button.
>
> Search with My Location.New! Search for business, weather, and movie
> information without specifying where you are.
>
> Local search suggestions on a map. See nearby business suggestions on
> Google Maps -- just tap the "near me" suggestions.
>
> Instant access to search. Start a Google search with just one click.
>
> Google Suggest. Get relevant search suggestions as you type, saving
> you keystrokes.
>
> URL suggestions. Get to popular web sites quickly by tapping site web
> address suggestions.
>
> Contact search. Quickly find contacts in your address book.
>
> Search history. Get instant access to your previous searches.
>
> Easy access to other Google products. Launch other Google products
> like Maps, Gmail and News from the Apps tab.
>
>
> http://phobos.apple.com/webobjects/mzstore.woa/wa/viewsoftware?id=284815942&mt
> =8
Link is broken:
" Not Found

The requested URL /webobjects/mzstore.woa/wa/viewsoftware was not found on
this server.

Apache/2.0.58 (Unix) Server at phobos.apple.com Port 80"
4phun
2008-11-18 18:20:00 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 18, 12:41 pm, George Kerby <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
> On 11/17/08 11:10 PM, in article
> 5284c053-f7dc-4715-a79f-***@o4g2000pra.googlegroups.com, "4phun"
>
>
>
> <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> > On Nov 18, 12:04 am, 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> >> I found and downloaded the voice update to Google Mobile and it is by
> >> far the best update to any app ever at the iTunes store.
>
> >> FAST
> >> ACCURATE
> >> AND BEYOND EASY TO USE
>
> >> INSTANT RESULTS CUSTOMIZED FOR THE IPHONE!
>
> >> This application alone will sell a ton of iPhones this season. It is
> >> that good!
>
> >> And so far you will only find it on the iPhone at AT&T
>
> >> To bad, so sad, if you can't have it!
>
> >> ;>)
>
> > MORE
>
> > Features
>
> > Voice Search.New! Speak your queries without even pushing a single
> > button.
>
> > Search with My Location.New! Search for business, weather, and movie
> > information without specifying where you are.
>
> > Local search suggestions on a map. See nearby business suggestions on
> > Google Maps -- just tap the "near me" suggestions.
>
> > Instant access to search. Start a Google search with just one click.
>
> > Google Suggest. Get relevant search suggestions as you type, saving
> > you keystrokes.
>
> > URL suggestions. Get to popular web sites quickly by tapping site web
> > address suggestions.
>
> > Contact search. Quickly find contacts in your address book.
>
> > Search history. Get instant access to your previous searches.
>
> > Easy access to other Google products. Launch other Google products
> > like Maps, Gmail and News from the Apps tab.
>
> >http://phobos.apple.com/webobjects/mzstore.woa/wa/viewsoftware?id=284...
> > =8
>
> Link is broken:
> " Not Found
>
> The requested URL /webobjects/mzstore.woa/wa/viewsoftware was not found on
> this server.
>
> Apache/2.0.58 (Unix) Server at phobos.apple.com Port 80"


That link activates iTunes App Store on a Mac or PC, does nothing in
Linux - dead end
Probably the App store is overloaded right now downloading that app.
George Kerby
2008-11-18 20:49:50 UTC
Permalink
On 11/18/08 12:20 PM, in article
9e26c869-8c73-4a5a-8902-***@u29g2000pro.googlegroups.com, "4phun"
<***@gmail.com> wrote:

> On Nov 18, 12:41 pm, George Kerby <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> On 11/17/08 11:10 PM, in article
>> 5284c053-f7dc-4715-a79f-***@o4g2000pra.googlegroups.com, "4phun"
>>
>>
>>
>> <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> On Nov 18, 12:04 am, 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> I found and downloaded the voice update to Google Mobile and it is by
>>>> far the best update to any app ever at the iTunes store.
>>
>>>> FAST
>>>> ACCURATE
>>>> AND BEYOND EASY TO USE
>>
>>>> INSTANT RESULTS CUSTOMIZED FOR THE IPHONE!
>>
>>>> This application alone will sell a ton of iPhones this season. It is
>>>> that good!
>>
>>>> And so far you will only find it on the iPhone at AT&T
>>
>>>> To bad, so sad, if you can't have it!
>>
>>>> ;>)
>>
>>> MORE
>>
>>> Features
>>
>>> Voice Search.New! Speak your queries without even pushing a single
>>> button.
>>
>>> Search with My Location.New! Search for business, weather, and movie
>>> information without specifying where you are.
>>
>>> Local search suggestions on a map. See nearby business suggestions on
>>> Google Maps -- just tap the "near me" suggestions.
>>
>>> Instant access to search. Start a Google search with just one click.
>>
>>> Google Suggest. Get relevant search suggestions as you type, saving
>>> you keystrokes.
>>
>>> URL suggestions. Get to popular web sites quickly by tapping site web
>>> address suggestions.
>>
>>> Contact search. Quickly find contacts in your address book.
>>
>>> Search history. Get instant access to your previous searches.
>>
>>> Easy access to other Google products. Launch other Google products
>>> like Maps, Gmail and News from the Apps tab.
>>
>>> http://phobos.apple.com/webobjects/mzstore.woa/wa/viewsoftware?id=284...
>
>>> =8
>>
>> Link is broken:
>> " Not Found
>>
>> The requested URL /webobjects/mzstore.woa/wa/viewsoftware was not found on
>> this server.
>>
>> Apache/2.0.58 (Unix) Server at phobos.apple.com Port 80"
>
>
> That link activates iTunes App Store on a Mac or PC, does nothing in
> Linux - dead end
> Probably the App store is overloaded right now downloading that app.
Nope. I just went to the store and downloaded here on the iMac and sync the
iPhone no problem. Have been having a ball with it ever since.

That POS youtube video that Larry touted is right out of something that was
magic - thirty years ago, LOL!

But the link was, and still is, screwy...
Larry
2008-11-18 05:32:26 UTC
Permalink
4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote in news:11865e54-dff1-4551-84d2-
***@w1g2000prk.googlegroups.com:

> To bad, so sad, if you can't have it!
>
> ;>)
>
>
>

You stupid ass. The rest of us have had voice recognition and key entry
for YEARS. Where you been...oh, up Apple's ass, right.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOf1XQyxyHU

It works on Google.....IT WORKS ON EVERYTHING!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1tt_aeIAM8
Tazti works really good....but just EATS CPU.
Listen to the very end....it's for mobiles!
iPhone 3Gold
2008-11-18 16:07:19 UTC
Permalink
Google Voice Search could be Iphone killer app

But you'll have to talk like Loyd Grossman

By Stewart Meagher: Tuesday, 18 November 2008, 10:17 AM

IT'S FOUR DAYS LATE but Google's Voice Search function has finally
appeared on the Iphone. And it really works!

There are some localisation issues for UK users but the app, available
free from Itunes, is really useful and, in a totally unintentional
way, a lot of fun.

Basically, Voice Search tends to get a little confused with the INQ's
perfectly plummy British accent and returns some unexpected results.

We wanted to stretch Google's voice recognition service to the full by
asking it to search for something quintessentially British, so we
booted up the application and held the handset up to our lughole.

The proximity detector built into the Iphone automagically detects
that you are holding the phone against your head and lets out a gentle
beep to let you know it's ready to recieve your words of wisdom.

"Indian Take Away" we asked in our best BBC-approved English.

The software takes a second or two to sample the voice clip and send
it off to a server somewhere across the pond to be interrogated by
some clever voice recognition voodoo. It really is quite impressive
that, in less than two seconds, we were learning everything we could
ever wish to know about something called the Indiana Raceway. D'oh!

Adopting a slightly mid-atlantic drawl and extending vowels until we
sounded like a slightly drunk Loyd Grossman garnered better results.
Speaking like Stephen Hawking's voice synthesiser thingy worked even
better.

"Swimming Pool" found us our local sports centre. "Apple Store"
returned results including directions to our local High Street outlet,
as well as links to the UK store online. "Taxi" was translated as
"sexy" which kept us busy for a few more minutes.

"Woolworths" sent us off to Norwood Massachusetts, regaled us with
tales of dwarfs and showed us how to make a Waldorf salad until we
tried saying it using our best John Wayne impression. Bingo! fourth
time lucky.

Sometimes it just goes completely bananas, a search for "Dunstable
Lock and Safe" returned results for "printable welcome sign"! Go
figure.

But if you don't mind looking a bit of a berk by bellowing in a cod
Yank accent into your phone in the middle of Chipping Sodbury High
Street and you're not expecting perfection - happy to be lead astray
on the internet with all the joys that can entail - this one could
become an Iphone essential. µ
iPhone 3Gold
2008-11-18 16:11:06 UTC
Permalink
November 18, 2008, 12:30 am
Google, iPhone and the Future of Machines That Listen
By John Markoff

How do you talk to a search engine? In Googlish, of course.

Google’s new speech recognition service for the iPhone, which I wrote
about last week and which was released on Monday, understands you most
accurately when you speak to it just the way you enter queries into
the Google search box. That makes sense, because the system’s accuracy
comes from the billions and billions of typed queries that Google has
recorded over the years.
Google’s voice search software for iPhones. (Peter DaSilva for The New
York Times)

So don’t bother with polite formalisms like “What is the best pizza
restaurant in San Francisco?” Simply say “best pizza restaurant San
Francisco.”

After all, you’re talking to a dumb machine — or perhaps several,
distributed across multiple states.

The accuracy is far from 100 percent, and probably not even 95 percent
(Google execs demurred when I asked if they had any meaningful
accuracy statistics). My experience is that it captures your voice
query substantially more than half the time, and that in itself is a
revelation. It also makes the usual sampling of funny mistakes. (My
favorite was my inability to get it to recognize “Camp Unalayee,”
which I attended as a teenager. It would usually respond “Camp
Ukulele.” But heck, unalayee is a Cherokee word that means “place of
friends,” and ukulele is in the dictionary.)

Yet after five days of using the service it still seems better than
any speech recognition system I have used to date. It may even signify
an inflection point — speech recognition that is more useful than
typing.

I was initially intrigued by the Google Mobile App because I have been
following the progress of speech recognition research since the early
1980s. Progress in this field feels like watching paint dry. Yet the
industry’s visionaries have been unanimous in saying that we will talk
to machines — and they will understand us — someday.

It was probably in 1983 that researchers at SRI International
demonstrated how they could control simulated battleships with voice
commands (“go left,” “go right,” “stop,” that sort of thing).
Evolution has been slow because it turns out that recognizing speech
is a really, really hard problem. There are all the complexities of
language, plus accents and background noise.

In the past decade, however, progress has accelerated. The stakes are
very high and there are a number of big and small players. The search
giants Google, Microsoft and Yahoo all believe speech recognition is a
prerequisite for the era of mobile computing. And there are lots of
others including I.B.M., Nuance and Vlingo that are developing speech
technology.

Although Microsoft hasn’t dominated in this area yet, the company has
been investing heavily in research in the field going back to the
1980s. Last year it spent close to $1 billion to acquire Tellme
Networks, a company based in Silicon Valley that supplies speech
recognition for the phone directory and operator assistance market.

“You want to be able to interact with your phone just like you would
with your mom or friends,” said Dariusz Paczuski, senior director for
consumer services at Tellme. “Voice is a great interface and it can
simplify interactions more than anything.”

Everyone agrees that in mobile applications, speech is the obvious
user interface. Whether it’s on a BlackBerry, an Android phone or an
iPhone, typing will always be error-prone and frustrating.

If one company makes a major breakthrough in voice, it is potentially
a major threat to its rivals, because a “speech interface” could
potentially allow one company to simply take over a handheld device
developed by another company.

For some time we seem to have been stuck at the stage where speech
recognition works, but just sort of. Perhaps we are at a moment like
the one when A.T.M.’s were first introduced. At first most people said
they preferred interacting with a human bank teller. Then, overnight
it seemed, everyone realized that the bank teller relationship wasn’t
all it was cracked up to be. Now most of us never set foot inside a
bank. How long before people find that it is more efficient to deal
with a robot on the phone than a human?

Enough with the future-gazing. Right now there is something compelling
about saying “backpacking trails Trinity Alps California,” and being
taken directly to a Web site listing all of the best ones.

If you’ve tried out voice searching with the Google Mobile App for
iPhone, leave a comment and let us know how it went.
iPhone 3Gold
2008-11-18 16:25:50 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 18, 11:11 am, iPhone 3Gold <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> November 18, 2008, 12:30 am
> Google, iPhone and the Future of Machines That Listen
> By John Markoff
>
> How do you talk to a search engine? In Googlish, of course.
>
> Google’s new speech recognition service for the iPhone, which I wrote
> about last week and which was released on Monday, understands you most
> accurately when you speak to it just the way you enter queries into
> the Google search box. That makes sense, because the system’s accuracy
> comes from the billions and billions of typed queries that Google has
> recorded over the years.
> Google’s voice search software for iPhones. (Peter DaSilva for The New
> York Times)
>
> So don’t bother with polite formalisms like “What is the best pizza
> restaurant in San Francisco?” Simply say “best pizza restaurant San
> Francisco.”
>
> After all, you’re talking to a dumb machine — or perhaps several,
> distributed across multiple states.
>
> The accuracy is far from 100 percent, and probably not even 95 percent
> (Google execs demurred when I asked if they had any meaningful
> accuracy statistics). My experience is that it captures your voice
> query substantially more than half the time, and that in itself is a
> revelation. It also makes the usual sampling of funny mistakes. (My
> favorite was my inability to get it to recognize “Camp Unalayee,”
> which I attended as a teenager. It would usually respond “Camp
> Ukulele.” But heck, unalayee is a Cherokee word that means “place of
> friends,” and ukulele is in the dictionary.)
>
> Yet after five days of using the service it still seems better than
> any speech recognition system I have used to date. It may even signify
> an inflection point — speech recognition that is more useful than
> typing.
>
> I was initially intrigued by the Google Mobile App because I have been
> following the progress of speech recognition research since the early
> 1980s. Progress in this field feels like watching paint dry. Yet the
> industry’s visionaries have been unanimous in saying that we will talk
> to machines — and they will understand us — someday.
>
> It was probably in 1983 that researchers at SRI International
> demonstrated how they could control simulated battleships with voice
> commands (“go left,” “go right,” “stop,” that sort of thing).
> Evolution has been slow because it turns out that recognizing speech
> is a really, really hard problem. There are all the complexities of
> language, plus accents and background noise.
>
> In the past decade, however, progress has accelerated. The stakes are
> very high and there are a number of big and small players. The search
> giants Google, Microsoft and Yahoo all believe speech recognition is a
> prerequisite for the era of mobile computing. And there are lots of
> others including I.B.M., Nuance and Vlingo that are developing speech
> technology.
>
> Although Microsoft hasn’t dominated in this area yet, the company has
> been investing heavily in research in the field going back to the
> 1980s. Last year it spent close to $1 billion to acquire Tellme
> Networks, a company based in Silicon Valley that supplies speech
> recognition for the phone directory and operator assistance market.
>
> “You want to be able to interact with your phone just like you would
> with your mom or friends,” said Dariusz Paczuski, senior director for
> consumer services at Tellme. “Voice is a great interface and it can
> simplify interactions more than anything.”
>
> Everyone agrees that in mobile applications, speech is the obvious
> user interface. Whether it’s on a BlackBerry, an Android phone or an
> iPhone, typing will always be error-prone and frustrating.
>
> If one company makes a major breakthrough in voice, it is potentially
> a major threat to its rivals, because a “speech interface” could
> potentially allow one company to simply take over a handheld device
> developed by another company.
>
> For some time we seem to have been stuck at the stage where speech
> recognition works, but just sort of. Perhaps we are at a moment like
> the one when A.T.M.’s were first introduced. At first most people said
> they preferred interacting with a human bank teller. Then, overnight
> it seemed, everyone realized that the bank teller relationship wasn’t
> all it was cracked up to be. Now most of us never set foot inside a
> bank. How long before people find that it is more efficient to deal
> with a robot on the phone than a human?
>
> Enough with the future-gazing. Right now there is something compelling
> about saying “backpacking trails Trinity Alps California,” and being
> taken directly to a Web site listing all of the best ones.
>
> If you’ve tried out voice searching with the Google Mobile App for
> iPhone, leave a comment and let us know how it went.

Google is providing iPhone owners with means to search everything they
could possibly want through speech. An update to the free Google
Mobile App will enable it to sense when the user wants to do a voice
search, through the built in accelerometer, according to an YouTube
demonstration of the app.

A NY Times report reveals that Google researchers have achieved this
by adding sophisticated voice recognition technology to the Google app
available for free download via the iTunes App Store. If you need to
find out things, like where is the nearest restaurant, you actually
ask the phone “where is the nearest StarBucks” and Google Search will
instantly produce results. Best of all, the results are based on your
location.

So, whether you live in San Francisco, New York, or UK, the same
question is answered differently by the Google Mobile App, which
senses your location. Not to worry, though - you can still do your
text searches, and even use the app's convenient suggestions and
options to zero in on something.

It has been revealed in the NY Times report that Google’s advantage in
this field is the ability to store and analyze vast amounts of data.
“Whatever they introduce now, it will greatly increase in accuracy in
three or six months,” said Raj Reddy, an artificial intelligence
researcher at Carnegie Mellon University, who has done pioneering work
in voice recognition. “It’s important to understand that machine
recognition will never be perfect,” he added.

“The question is, How close can they come to human performance?”
4phun
2008-11-18 17:37:50 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 18, 11:25 am, iPhone 3Gold <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Nov 18, 11:11 am, iPhone 3Gold <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > November 18, 2008, 12:30 am
> > Google, iPhone and the Future of Machines That Listen
> > By John Markoff
>
> > How do you talk to a search engine? In Googlish, of course.
>
> > Google’s new speech recognition service for the iPhone, which I wrote
> > about last week and which was released on Monday, understands you most
> > accurately when you speak to it just the way you enter queries into
> > the Google search box. That makes sense, because the system’s accuracy
> > comes from the billions and billions of typed queries that Google has
> > recorded over the years.
> > Google’s voice search software for iPhones. (Peter DaSilva for The New
> > York Times)
>
> > So don’t bother with polite formalisms like “What is the best pizza
> > restaurant in San Francisco?” Simply say “best pizza restaurant San
> > Francisco.”
>
> > After all, you’re talking to a dumb machine — or perhaps several,
> > distributed across multiple states.
>
> > The accuracy is far from 100 percent, and probably not even 95 percent
> > (Google execs demurred when I asked if they had any meaningful
> > accuracy statistics). My experience is that it captures your voice
> > query substantially more than half the time, and that in itself is a
> > revelation. It also makes the usual sampling of funny mistakes. (My
> > favorite was my inability to get it to recognize “Camp Unalayee,”
> > which I attended as a teenager. It would usually respond “Camp
> > Ukulele.” But heck, unalayee is a Cherokee word that means “place of
> > friends,” and ukulele is in the dictionary.)
>
> > Yet after five days of using the service it still seems better than
> > any speech recognition system I have used to date. It may even signify
> > an inflection point — speech recognition that is more useful than
> > typing.
>
> > I was initially intrigued by the Google Mobile App because I have been
> > following the progress of speech recognition research since the early
> > 1980s. Progress in this field feels like watching paint dry. Yet the
> > industry’s visionaries have been unanimous in saying that we will talk
> > to machines — and they will understand us — someday.
>
> > It was probably in 1983 that researchers at SRI International
> > demonstrated how they could control simulated battleships with voice
> > commands (“go left,” “go right,” “stop,” that sort of thing).
> > Evolution has been slow because it turns out that recognizing speech
> > is a really, really hard problem. There are all the complexities of
> > language, plus accents and background noise.
>
> > In the past decade, however, progress has accelerated. The stakes are
> > very high and there are a number of big and small players. The search
> > giants Google, Microsoft and Yahoo all believe speech recognition is a
> > prerequisite for the era of mobile computing. And there are lots of
> > others including I.B.M., Nuance and Vlingo that are developing speech
> > technology.
>
> > Although Microsoft hasn’t dominated in this area yet, the company has
> > been investing heavily in research in the field going back to the
> > 1980s. Last year it spent close to $1 billion to acquire Tellme
> > Networks, a company based in Silicon Valley that supplies speech
> > recognition for the phone directory and operator assistance market.
>
> > “You want to be able to interact with your phone just like you would
> > with your mom or friends,” said Dariusz Paczuski, senior director for
> > consumer services at Tellme. “Voice is a great interface and it can
> > simplify interactions more than anything.”
>
> > Everyone agrees that in mobile applications, speech is the obvious
> > user interface. Whether it’s on a BlackBerry, an Android phone or an
> > iPhone, typing will always be error-prone and frustrating.
>
> > If one company makes a major breakthrough in voice, it is potentially
> > a major threat to its rivals, because a “speech interface” could
> > potentially allow one company to simply take over a handheld device
> > developed by another company.
>
> > For some time we seem to have been stuck at the stage where speech
> > recognition works, but just sort of. Perhaps we are at a moment like
> > the one when A.T.M.’s were first introduced. At first most people said
> > they preferred interacting with a human bank teller. Then, overnight
> > it seemed, everyone realized that the bank teller relationship wasn’t
> > all it was cracked up to be. Now most of us never set foot inside a
> > bank. How long before people find that it is more efficient to deal
> > with a robot on the phone than a human?
>
> > Enough with the future-gazing. Right now there is something compelling
> > about saying “backpacking trails Trinity Alps California,” and being
> > taken directly to a Web site listing all of the best ones.
>
> > If you’ve tried out voice searching with the Google Mobile App for
> > iPhone, leave a comment and let us know how it went.
>
> Google is providing iPhone owners with means to search everything they
> could possibly want through speech. An update to the free Google
> Mobile App will enable it to sense when the user wants to do a voice
> search, through the built in accelerometer, according to an YouTube
> demonstration of the app.
>
> A NY Times report reveals that Google researchers have achieved this
> by adding sophisticated voice recognition technology to the Google app
> available for free download via the iTunes App Store. If you need to
> find out things, like where is the nearest restaurant, you actually
> ask the phone “where is the nearest StarBucks” and Google Search will
> instantly produce results. Best of all, the results are based on your
> location.
>
> So, whether you live in San Francisco, New York, or UK, the same
> question is answered differently by the Google Mobile App, which
> senses your location. Not to worry, though - you can still do your
> text searches, and even use the app's convenient suggestions and
> options to zero in on something.
>
> It has been revealed in the NY Times report that Google’s advantage in
> this field is the ability to store and analyze vast amounts of data.
> “Whatever they introduce now, it will greatly increase in accuracy in
> three or six months,” said Raj Reddy, an artificial intelligence
> researcher at Carnegie Mellon University, who has done pioneering work
> in voice recognition. “It’s important to understand that machine
> recognition will never be perfect,” he added.
>
> “The question is, How close can they come to human performance?”

Google Voice Search, an early Christmas present for iPhone owners
Mobility
By Christian Zibreg
Tuesday, November 18, 2008 10:17

Mountain View (CA) – Google’s much anticipated voice search
application has finally arrived at Apple’s AppStore. And after playing
with the software for a few hours we have to say that we are deeply
impressed. There is something unique and mind-changing about being
able to pick up the handset, say "movie show times" and receive not
only general search results, but information about movie show times at
theaters in the area of your current geographical location.

Following a weekend of uncertainty and lots of speculation about
growing tensions between Apple and Google, the companies released
Google’s promised voice search iPhone application late on Monday. And
as far as we can tell, the software works just as we were told: You
pick up the handset, say a search query and the application returns
search results in text. "Just hold the phone to your ear, wait for the
beep, and say what you're looking for," wrote Dave Burke, Google
mobile team engineer manager in a blog post. "That's it. Just talk."

Although it was believed that Google would release the software as a
standalone application, the company updated its existing free iPhone
application called Google Mobile App with two new features: “Voice
Search” and “Search with My Location”. Google Mobile App is an iPhone-
optimized front-end interface to common Google services, like search
and maps. It can be used to start a Google search with a single click,
get relevant search and URL suggestions during typing, access past
searches and display nearby business suggestions on a map.

If you have ever worked with speech recognition software before, then
you know how much time can go into training an application to reduce
the error rate of recognized words and phrases. Voice Search does not
need any training. The software uses the iPhone’s accelerometer sensor
to detect when a user moves the handset close to the ear and
automatically switches to "listening mode" (which can be triggered
manually as well, simply by tapping the microphone icon.) Users can
also bring up the virtual keyboard to modify the search terms by
double tapping the search box.

Search with the “My Location” feature allows you to perform a local
search without having to specify where you are. The feature works in
tandem with geolocation features of the handset to deliver results
tailored to your current location. For example, if you pick up the
handset and say "restaurants", "weather", or "movie show times" you
will get corresponding information that is relevant to your current
geographical information displayed on a map. To make this feature
work, the “Location Services” option in the iPhone Settings needs to
be enabled – and users are required to agree that Google Mobile App
can tap into your location data.

So far, we have discovered only two drawbacks. First, when you click
on any search result, the application opens a link in Safari. This
goes against the idea of searching in a single application, because
you have to quit Safari and open Google Mobile App to perform another
search. We would love to see an app built into the web browser so that
we can perform searches and follow links on a results page - all from
within the application.

Second, you can't voice-search contacts in your address book, which is
understandable since the speech recognition feature does not run
within the application, but on Google servers. Also, we have to
mention that Voice Search is currently only available to U.S. users.
iPhone users who do not have an iTunes Store account that is
authorized through a credit card issued in the U.S. will not be able
to download the application until Google releases versions for other
markets.

Overall, this is one of the most useful iPhone applications available
today. It seems as if Google has found a way to remove the
experimental character from voice recognition and finally come up with
a solution that can be used on an everyday basis. A feature like this
on a cellphone would have been considered science-fiction just one
year ago.

It seems that, despite all rumors, Apple and Google are still buddies.
But we do have to say that we are a bit surprised that this feature
was introduced on the iPhone first and not on Google’s own G1 Android
phone sold by T-Mobile.
4phun
2008-11-18 17:40:14 UTC
Permalink
This is the first step to true and accurate voice recognition and
translation:

1) Google user speaks search string into phone.

2) Google gets it wrong, user corrects Google

3) Multiply by millions of searches daily with constant correction and
feedback from users

4) Perfect voice rec, major profit

There will be a few issues with voice recognition to begin with but as
it gets better and more people use the service and add to the database
with their corrections and add to the pool of variable accents etc the
accuracy will be perfected at an exponential rate.

A similar concept could apply to translations. Once voice recognition
is perfected and becomes the primary search input of choice then more
people will be able to use their phones as direct voice to voice
translators. Obvious translation mistakes will become apparent through
mass use. At every turn users could flag apparent mistranslations and
through the help of the Google Borg accurate translations would
evolve. Much the same way that Wikipedia pages tend to accuracy over
time even with the input of a subset of "disruptive" users.
4phun
2008-11-18 17:54:28 UTC
Permalink
"Why don't they let more than just iPhone users take advantage of
this, dagnabbit?"

For the same reasons all the nerds despise the iPhone: because of it's
uniformity right across the board, powerful graphics and CPU and
consistent user experience. If you want to debut a powerful
application, the iPhone makes the most sense of any platform.

And given the fractured nature of every other vendors offerings, why
ruin the experiment on crappy inconsistent platforms?

Go with the best, someday release for the rest.
4phun
2008-11-18 18:13:08 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 18, 12:54 pm, 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> "Why don't they let more than just iPhone users take advantage of
> this, dagnabbit?"
>
> For the same reasons all the nerds despise the iPhone: because of it's
> uniformity right across the board, powerful graphics and CPU and
> consistent user experience. If you want to debut a powerful
> application, the iPhone makes the most sense of any platform.
>
> And given the fractured nature of every other vendors offerings, why
> ruin the experiment on crappy inconsistent platforms?
>
> Go with the best, someday release for the rest.

The app is FREE
Google Mobile Voice Search

Plus connection is FREE
Google Mobile Search for the iPhone doesn't require cell minutes as
the voice is transfered via data connection of Wifi or 3G

Plus results are FREE
and results aren't some crappy SMS or MMS message but full graphics
and RTF transfered via data connection again not using SMS units.
4phun
2008-11-18 18:38:40 UTC
Permalink
> On Nov 18, 12:54 pm, 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:

> > Go with the best, someday release for the rest.
>


Voice in Google Mobile App: A Tipping Point for the Web?
by Tim O'Reilly

As I wrote in Daddy, Where's Your Phone?, it's time to start thinking
of the phone as a first class device for accessing web services, not
as a way of repurposing content or applications originally designed to
be accessed on a keyboard and big screen. The release of speech
recognition in Google Mobile App for iPhone continues the process
begun with the iPhone itself, of building a new, phone-native way of
delivering computing services. Here are two of the key elements:

1. Sensor-based interfaces. Apple wowed us with iPhone touch
screen, but the inclusion of the accelerometer was almost as
important, and now Google has shown us how it can be used as a key
component of an application user interface. Put the phone to your ear,
and the application starts listening, triggered by the natural gesture
rather than by an artificial tap or click. Yes, the accelerometer has
been used in games like tilt, parlor amusements like the iPint, but
Google has pushed things further by integrating it into a kind of
workflow with the phone's main sensor, the microphone.

This is the future of mobile: to invent interfaces that throw
away the assumptions of the previous generation. Point and click was a
breakthrough for PCs, but it's a trap for mobile interface design.
Right now, the iPhone (and other similar smartphones) have an array of
sensors: the microphone, the camera, the touchscreen, the
accelerometer, the location sensor (GPS or cell triangulation), and
yes, on many, the keyboard and pointing device. Future applications
will surprise us by using them in new ways, and in new combinations;
future devices will provide richer and richer arrays of senses (yes,
senses, not just sensors) for paying attention to what we want.

Could a phone recognize the gesture of raising the camera up and
then holding it steady to launch the camera application? Could we talk
to the phone to adjust camera settings? (There's a constrained
language around lighting and speed and focus that should be easy to
recognize.) Could a phone recognize the motion of a car and switch
automatically to voice dialing? And of course, there are all the Wii-
like interactions with other devices that are possible when we think
of the phone as a controller. Sensor based workflows are the future of
UI design.

2. Cloud integration. It's easy to forget that the speech
recognition isn't happening on your phone. It's happening on Google's
servers. It's Google's vast database of speech data that makes the
speech recognition work so well. It would be hard to pack all that
into a local device.

And that of course is the future of mobile as well. A mobile
phone is inherently a connected device with local memory and
processing. But it's time we realized that the local compute power is
a fraction of what's available in the cloud. Web applications take
this for granted -- for example, when we request a map tile for our
phone -- but it's surprising how many native applications settle
themselves comfortably in their silos. (Consider my long-ago complaint
that the phone address book cries out to be a connected application
powered by my phone company's call-history database, annotated by data
harvested from my online social networking applications as well as
other online sources.)

Put these two trends together, and we can imagine the future of
mobile: a sensor-rich device with applications that use those sensors
both to feed and interact with cloud services. The location sensor
knows you're here so you don't need to tell the map server where to
start; the microphone knows the sound of your voice, so it unlocks
your private data in the cloud; the camera images an object or a
person, sends it to a remote application that recognizes it, and
retrieves relevant data. All of these things already exist in
scattered applications, but eventually, they will be the new normal.

This is an incredibly exciting time in mobile application design.
There are breakthroughs waiting to happen. Voice and gesture
recognition in the Google Mobile App is just the beginning.
4phun
2008-11-18 19:22:59 UTC
Permalink
Nine tips for the Google Mobile App for iPhone

November 18, 2008 @ 12:20 am ·


Here are some tips to help you get the most out of Google’s new Mobile
Application for the iPhone.

1. To get Google Mobile App on your iPhone, go to the App Store and
search for “Google Mobile App,” or click on this link to install from
a computer. If you have an older version of Google Mobile App
installed, you might want to uninstall the older version before
installing the newer version.
2. Voice recognition is turned off by default for non-U.S. users.
To enable voice recognition, click on the “Settings” tab at the bottom
of the screen and slide “Voice Search” to ON.
3. If you hold the iPhone up to your ear and don’t hear the “baBUM”
sound to start talking, swing the iPhone down and back up to your ear.
Sometimes a little wrist flick helps to tell the iPhone you want to
search.
4. You can search things besides Google’s main web index. Do a
regular query such as [daffodil pictures]:

Daffodil pictures

then press on the magnifying glass near the top left corner to
bring up other options to search. By default you’re searching iPhone
and Web, but you can also search Maps, Images, News, Shopping, or
Wikipedia:

Daffodil pictures

Press an option like Images and the application will immediately
redo the query:

Daffodil pictures
5. If you want to go straight to the onscreen keyboard, you can tap
the “Search” tab at the bottom of the screen twice.
6. Searching with the keyboard can be very handy. As you type, the
application will suggest contacts, websites, previous searches, and
related query suggestions:

Outback Steakhouse

and do you see those query suggestions in the middle of the
screen? You can slide/flick them to get more suggestions:

Outback Steakhouse
7. The “Apps” tab at the bottom of the screen is a one-stop shop to
get to all your Google services easily, including Google Apps versions
of services:

Apps tab
8. You can use Google Mobile App with multiple Google Apps
accounts. In the Settings tab, click on Domain. Then you can add
multiple domains, separated by commas.
9. Google has posted HTML documentation for Google Mobile App and
also provides a Google Mobile Help discussion group.

Bonus tip #1: If the voice recognition is close, you can press on the
green query in the search box to see other possible queries. For
example, if you said [background gradients in css] and got this search
query:

Refining query

Notice that the query was recognized as “gradient” instead of
“gradients” with an ’s’. So I pressed the green query and saw other
possible queries:

Refining query

My desired query was the second choice. :)

Bonus tip #2: If you want to understand what your cat is trying to say
to you, start the voice recognition and just hold it up to their mouth
as they meow. Then Google will try to convert the meow into regular
English text. Thanks to Sean Harding for this tip.
Todd Allcock
2008-11-18 19:15:26 UTC
Permalink
At 18 Nov 2008 09:54:28 -0800 4phun wrote:
> "Why don't they let more than just iPhone users take advantage of
> this, dagnabbit?"
>
> For the same reasons...

...they premier new commercials during the Super Bowl- everyone is watching
it! ;-)
4phun
2008-11-19 07:40:46 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 18, 12:54 pm, 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> "Why don't they let more than just iPhone users take advantage of
> this, dagnabbit?"
>
> For the same reasons all the nerds despise the iPhone: because of it's
> uniformity right across the board, powerful graphics and CPU and
> consistent user experience. If you want to debut a powerful
> application, the iPhone makes the most sense of any platform.
>
> And given the fractured nature of every other vendors offerings, why
> ruin the experiment on crappy inconsistent platforms?
>
> Go with the best, someday release for the rest.

PC World
Tuesday, November 18, 2008 1:10 PM PST
8 Reasons to Pick iPhone Over BlackBerry Storm

Lets face it, Apple designers have hit a home run when they created
the touch-screen-based iPhone. Apples design success is slick that
other phone manufacturers are diligently trying to recreate the
iPhone’s LFF (Look, Feel & Functionality). One of the latest phones to
enter the competition is the Blackberry Storm. While receiving glowing
reviews the Storm just does not quite make muster according to
PCWorld, particularly if you’re considering it as an iPhone
alternative.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/154131/iphone_beats_storm.html
Todd Allcock
2008-11-19 19:40:04 UTC
Permalink
"4phun" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:e00759af-cdde-41b6-90c8-***@v5g2000prm.googlegroups.com...

> PC World
> Tuesday, November 18, 2008 1:10 PM PST
> 8 Reasons to Pick iPhone Over BlackBerry Storm
>
> http://www.pcworld.com/article/154131/iphone_beats_storm.html

It was a "point/counterpoint" article. You missed the other link by the
same author (which Ron already posted in the AT&T NG):

http://www.cio.com/article/463019/RIM_BlackBerry_Storm_vs._iPhone_G_Reasons_to_Pick_the_Storm

Not to bash either article, but the author admits he actually hasn't used a
Storm yet, and based many of his points on how the current crop of
Blackberries work (i.e. he makes the assumption that the Storm's browser and
media player will be similar, or only marginally improved compared to the BB
Curve, etc.) Maybe I'm old fashioned, but I like my reviewers to actually
at least SEE a device before they start praising or bashing it! ;-)
4phun
2008-11-20 02:12:20 UTC
Permalink
November 19, 2008, 4:28 pm
Apple’s iPhone Apps Get a Life
By Roy Furchgott

I have previously chided iPhone App Store for not making it easier to
find what you want in the sea of more than 5,500 choices. But here is
a big step in the right direction, a nicely organized new web page
called “iPhone Your Life.” (Yeah, I know, shouldn’t the people who
make those innovative products and entertaining ads be able come up
with a better name?)

http://www.apple.com/iphone/iphone-your-life/

The page is loaded with tips and tricks for getting more out of your
iPhone, arranged by activity, like “At Home” and “World Travel.” The
site suggests apps that might be useful for that activity. Under
“Around Town,” it hawks a Yellow Pages app, one that reminds you when
your parking meter is running low, a taxi locator, and a way to find
nearby restaurants.

There is also a list of the basic apps, like “phone” and “mail” with
operating instructions and shortcuts to becoming a power user. You may
find features in your most common applications that you didn’t know
existed. Who knew that if you tap the iTunes Starbucks icon while in
the store it will tell you what song is currently playing?
MC
2008-11-20 11:30:51 UTC
Permalink
In article
<8dceb90f-7a0b-4f01-81e3-***@41g2000yqf.googlegroups.com>,
4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:

> November 19, 2008, 4:28 pm
> Apple¹s iPhone Apps Get a Life
> By Roy Furchgott
>
> I have previously chided iPhone App Store for not making it easier to
> find what you want in the sea of more than 5,500 choices. But here is
> a big step in the right direction, a nicely organized new web page
> called ³iPhone Your Life.² (Yeah, I know, shouldn¹t the people who
> make those innovative products and entertaining ads be able come up
> with a better name?)
>
> http://www.apple.com/iphone/iphone-your-life/


<SNIP>

Thanks. Excellent link.

--

What Washington needs is adult supervision.
- Barack Obama
4phun
2008-11-20 11:40:28 UTC
Permalink
BlackBerry's Storm: Awkward and Disappointing
Research in Motion's BlackBerry Storm looks handsome enough, but it
will disappoint prospective buyers hoping for a credible touch-based
iPhone alternative.

Yardena Arar, PC World
Nov 20, 2008 12:01 am

BlackBerry fans who've been yearning for a touch-based handset à la
iPhone now have one, but the BlackBerry Storm--which Verizon Wireless
plans to start selling Friday for $250 with a two-year contract--might
not be the smart phone of their dreams.

The decision by Research in Motion to differentiate the Storm by
giving its capacitive touch screen a mechanical component (the entire
screen functions as a button for confirming selections or initiating
actions) turns out to be more confusing than helpful. Ultimately, the
Storm's touch interface feels like a failed experiment.


It's too bad, because the Storm has some nice features and makes a
great first impression. Encased in shiny black with silvery accents on
the front and a removable matte metal cover in the back, the Storm is
shorter, slightly narrower, and somewhat thicker than the iPhone--not
surprising since it packs support for Verizon Wireless's fastest
network (EvDO Rev. A), for quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE, and for 2100-MHz
UMTS/HSPA networks, enabling overseas roaming on the fastest networks
available. The Storm also has a GPS receiver and Bluetooth, but no Wi-
Fi.


<Snip>

A Disappointing Touch

The touch-screen interface differentiates the Storm from its RIM
brethren--and there I was disappointed.

<snip>

Click to Type

Typing on the Storm isn't much fun, either. You have to click the
screen keyboard for each keystroke (the keys flash blue under your
fingertips as you click), which ends up feeling like a lot of work in
a way that typing on a hardware keyboard (or on the iPhone's software
keyboard, for that matter) never did. I worry, too, about how well the
mechanics of the click screen will hold up under the pressure of
continual use by heavy typers.

There's no obvious way to make the keyboard go away quickly, either,
if you want to see part of the screen that it's concealing.

<snip>

But people who were hoping for a credible iPhone alternative fortified
with BlackBerry's strengths as a mobile tool for corporate travelers
will likely find the Storm a disappointment. When it comes to touch
interfaces, Apple still has no peer.

[Even before seeing the BlackBerry Storm, some journalists had
reservations about it. Read a list of reasons to pick the iPhone over
the Storm by Al Sacco of our sister publication, CIO.]

http://www.pcworld.com/printable/article/id,154212/printable.html
Larry
2008-11-20 15:45:05 UTC
Permalink
4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote in news:370ae3c4-07b0-460a-983e-
***@k36g2000yqe.googlegroups.com:

> BlackBerry's Storm: Awkward and Disappointing
> Research in Motion's BlackBerry Storm looks handsome enough, but it
> will disappoint prospective buyers hoping for a credible touch-based
> iPhone alternative.
>

Stop being so paranoid, Vic. It's $199 after the $50 rebate game to
collect data with so same price as the Fruit. The kiddies won't buy it
because it's not for them....as are any Berries. Storm is for the
businessmen, the men with the money. Their IT department has already
told them your Fruitoy isn't a business machine and the company won't
pay for its security risks to their IT system. They trust the
Blackberrys they've been using for years, so will allow all the execs to
swap their keyboards for the Storm, en masse. That's the market for it.

All the big holes in the Fruitoy, the Storm fills.....
Swappable battery
external memory card slot to put the desktop data on
cut and paste and easier word processing
push email they won't even have to change from the old Berries
all those things that matter to the businesses Iphone doesn't and won't
have. Don't tell me about the MS patch to iphone. They've not been
using it with their old Berries and their new Storm uses the same system
they've grown up with and TRUST, the biggest hill to get into any
businesses graces.

Outside business, the horrible Apple ad budget eating the company's
profits will still keep the kiddies in line, even with all its
shortcomings they hate. "Cool" is the target it fills, besides the
drink coaster app.

Verizon's shitty attitude towards data usage will kill it just like the
Voyager and all the smartphones before it. If you use the tethering,
you go from unlimited data for just the Storm to their shitty 5GB/month
SHARED between the Storm and your laptop you pay them $30/mo EXTRA for
just to turn the tethering function on. That will keep users from
tethering to the Storm, except for business which will pay whatever
Verizon wants for data. Business already has Verizon's cards in their
laptops so won't care. That billing is separate....and deductable. For
the individual users, like me, Verizon will turn us off with high
charges and addons, addons, addons....just like always.
Kevin Weaver
2008-11-20 18:18:38 UTC
Permalink
"Larry" <***@home.com> wrote in message
news:***@74.209.131.13...
>
>
> 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote in news:370ae3c4-07b0-460a-983e-
> ***@k36g2000yqe.googlegroups.com:
>
>> BlackBerry's Storm: Awkward and Disappointing
>> Research in Motion's BlackBerry Storm looks handsome enough, but it
>> will disappoint prospective buyers hoping for a credible touch-based
>> iPhone alternative.
>>
>
> Stop being so paranoid, Vic. It's $199 after the $50 rebate game to
> collect data with so same price as the Fruit. The kiddies won't buy it
> because it's not for them....as are any Berries. Storm is for the
> businessmen, the men with the money. Their IT department has already
> told them your Fruitoy isn't a business machine and the company won't
> pay for its security risks to their IT system. They trust the
> Blackberrys they've been using for years, so will allow all the execs to
> swap their keyboards for the Storm, en masse. That's the market for it.
>
> All the big holes in the Fruitoy, the Storm fills.....
> Swappable battery
> external memory card slot to put the desktop data on
> cut and paste and easier word processing
> push email they won't even have to change from the old Berries
> all those things that matter to the businesses Iphone doesn't and won't
> have. Don't tell me about the MS patch to iphone. They've not been
> using it with their old Berries and their new Storm uses the same system
> they've grown up with and TRUST, the biggest hill to get into any
> businesses graces.
>
> Outside business, the horrible Apple ad budget eating the company's
> profits will still keep the kiddies in line, even with all its
> shortcomings they hate. "Cool" is the target it fills, besides the
> drink coaster app.
>
> Verizon's shitty attitude towards data usage will kill it just like the
> Voyager and all the smartphones before it. If you use the tethering,
> you go from unlimited data for just the Storm to their shitty 5GB/month
> SHARED between the Storm and your laptop you pay them $30/mo EXTRA for
> just to turn the tethering function on. That will keep users from
> tethering to the Storm, except for business which will pay whatever
> Verizon wants for data. Business already has Verizon's cards in their
> laptops so won't care. That billing is separate....and deductable. For
> the individual users, like me, Verizon will turn us off with high
> charges and addons, addons, addons....just like always.
>
In my area the kids are all wanting to get one. They want the touch screen.

Mom and dad won't change from Verizon. The kids from the poll they took that
covers about 100 miles tells that most of the kids wanted a iPhone.

But there all on there mom and dad's account. Mom and Dad can't or won't
change to AT&T. A friend sells Verizon and has already has paid orders for
about 30 of them sight unseen. Once the kids get them, there going to show
there friends and so on.
Elmo P. Shagnasty
2008-11-20 19:48:28 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@74.209.131.13>,
Larry <***@home.com> wrote:

> Storm is for the
> businessmen, the men with the money. Their IT department has already
> told them your Fruitoy isn't a business machine and the company won't
> pay for its security risks to their IT system.

I work for a Fortune 100 company that by and large uses Blackberries,
but any employee is free to use his own phone. Awhile back they told
everyone exactly what steps to go through to hook the iPhone up to the
corporate system, to get BB-style functionality.

And by "they told everyone," I mean they ADVERTISED it. It's not a
hidden "you have to know whom to call" thing.

It seems our IT infrastructure truly is one of support, not one of
prescribing how any of 50,000 people must do something.

Larry, your extremism is beneath you--oh, wait, that's not extremism,
that's an 8 year old girl. Never mind.
Ron
2008-11-20 19:58:20 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 20 Nov 2008 14:48:28 -0500, "Elmo P. Shagnasty"
<***@nastydesigns.com> wrote:

>In article <***@74.209.131.13>,
> Larry <***@home.com> wrote:
>
>> Storm is for the
>> businessmen, the men with the money. Their IT department has already
>> told them your Fruitoy isn't a business machine and the company won't
>> pay for its security risks to their IT system.
>
>I work for a Fortune 100 company that by and large uses Blackberries,
>but any employee is free to use his own phone. Awhile back they told
>everyone exactly what steps to go through to hook the iPhone up to the
>corporate system, to get BB-style functionality.
>
>And by "they told everyone," I mean they ADVERTISED it. It's not a
>hidden "you have to know whom to call" thing.
>
>It seems our IT infrastructure truly is one of support, not one of
>prescribing how any of 50,000 people must do something.

Thats the way an IT department should be. Make things easier for the
folks they support rather than make things easier for themselves.



>
>Larry, your extremism is beneath you--oh, wait, that's not extremism,
>that's an 8 year old girl. Never mind.
iPhone 3Gold
2008-11-20 21:11:54 UTC
Permalink
Still another update from Apple for the world's most popular smart
phone. It sure is nice not having to wait a lifetime to get an update.
I can feel the pain of those waiting for an update to a Sprint,
Verizon or T-Mobile phone. Does anyone know how many updates Apple has
rolled out this year?

--
iPhone 2.2 - What We Know So Far
Author: Robin Eddins

The exciting developments coming to the iPhone through the highly
anticipated release of firmware 2.2 have been consistently documented.
But now we want to bring you an overview of all the thrilling
advancements that will soon be available on an iPhone near you.

First, when can we expect the update already? Well, according to
MacRumors, we can expect its release on November 21st. The date has
not been confirmed and seems rather random considering there are no
planned events on that day. For something this huge and with so many
new changes you’d think a planned event would be appropriate, but in
true Apple style, they may just want to catch everyone off guard.

So far we have uncovered lots of gems hidden in the 2.2 beta 2
firmware, but even with all the discoveries, we found yet another rock
that was left unturned. Just discovered was new functionality of the
iPhone’s home button. Of course a single tap still exits any
application and returns to the home screen, but what about a single
tap when you are already on the home screen? In iPhone firmware 2.2 a
single tap returns the user back to the first page of the home screen.
That’s right, if you are one of those people that have pages and pages
of apps, one click brings you right back to see your SMS and other
favorite apps, no more finger swipe mania! Double tapping the home
button acts as it did before allowing you to choose to go to your
phone favorites or iPod.

Here’s a breakdown of everything that has been confirmed in the new
firmware after the jump:


App Store

* New category icons: An icon now appears next to each category
name. The icon is of an app that is currently in the store that
represents that category. The app icon Apple chooses to display next
to the category also changes sporadically, surely in only a way that
Apple can understand.
* Sorting within categories: Now when a user enters a category,
he will be able to sort the apps by “Top Paid,” “Top Free,” and
“Release Date.” Currently the apps only appear in order of release
date, so this will be a nice change for users looking to find quality
within a category.
* Multiple Screenshots: Users will now be able to see all the
screenshots of an application, just like they can on the desktop
iTunes rather than being limited to just one picture in the app
store.
* Report a Problem: Have a problem with an application? Does it
have a bug? Is it offensive? If so one click can send the note right
to the developer.

Podcasts

So what’s going on with Podcasts? well as previously reported , there
is a sexy new button on the iTunes tab bar that gives users the
ability to download podcasts directly from their iPhone.

* Both video and audio podcasts will be available for download
* Over-the-Air downloads on AT&T’s Edge and 3G networks (limit of
10MB)
* No file size limit when downloading over WiFi

Safari

It’s hard to improve on a good thing, so Safari will see very few
changes. The only confirmed change worth noting is the new newly
designed user interface to it’s address bar.

* The address bar on the top of the screen has been split into two
sections. Most of the space displays the URL, while the new section
contains room for a google search. When either area is clicked, the
view expands to the full size while the keyboard is displayed. It
matches the style Safari uses on the desktop, and makes the Google
search much more visible.

Maps

* Street View: Google street view is most likely the most highly
reported feature coming to the new firmware. iPhone users will now be
able to get the same view that was highly publicized for Android
Phones.

* Walking Directions: No car, no problem. Users will be able to
choose to get walking directions,the time estimates even change to
accommodate the slower mode of transportation. This is really handy
in crowded cities with one-way roads that don’t impact the walkers.

* Public Transportation: Find your way using only public
transit! Maps now offers directions and combines different means of
public transportation to get you to your destination. A true treat to
someone in a new city and with no rental car.

* Location Sharing: Maps now makes it a snap to send your current
location, or any other location to anyone you want via email. Launch
maps, drop a pin and simply email anyone you choose. If you receive a
location it launches your maps application and lets you directions
directly. So what’s the point of Loopt again?

Other Improvements

* Support for Audio Line-in: The headphone jack will be able to
take accessories that will allow users to record anything they wish,
including real instruments.
* Auto-Correction settings: This feature can now be turned off
for those of us who have mastered the iPhone keypad.
* Support for new languages
* Rating System: Also, as previously reported, the new rating
system will be implemented in 2.2. The rating system will prompt app
users to give a rating upon deleting an app, a questionable system.
It’s hard to image any user giving anything other than a 1 star rating
after DELETING an app.

Now, don’t worry, we haven’t forgotten about the emoticons, however,
it’s still unclear if they will actually be included in the update and
we cannot confirm they will be there as of this time. Something almost
not worth mentioning is that now when you forget your voicemail
password, you will be prompted to call AT&T… I recommend skipping this
process and using the Direct Line app to get through.
Kevin Weaver
2008-11-21 00:26:31 UTC
Permalink
"iPhone 3Gold" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:072f7add-d4ee-4fcf-a2a2-***@k36g2000yqe.googlegroups.com...
Still another update from Apple for the world's most popular smart
phone. It sure is nice not having to wait a lifetime to get an update.
I can feel the pain of those waiting for an update to a Sprint,
Verizon or T-Mobile phone. Does anyone know how many updates Apple has
rolled out this year?

--
iPhone 2.2 - What We Know So Far
Author: Robin Eddins

The exciting developments coming to the iPhone through the highly
anticipated release of firmware 2.2 have been consistently documented.
But now we want to bring you an overview of all the thrilling
advancements that will soon be available on an iPhone near you.

First, when can we expect the update already? Well, according to
MacRumors, we can expect its release on November 21st. The date has
not been confirmed and seems rather random considering there are no
planned events on that day. For something this huge and with so many
new changes you’d think a planned event would be appropriate, but in
true Apple style, they may just want to catch everyone off guard.

So far we have uncovered lots of gems hidden in the 2.2 beta 2
firmware, but even with all the discoveries, we found yet another rock
that was left unturned. Just discovered was new functionality of the
iPhone’s home button. Of course a single tap still exits any
application and returns to the home screen, but what about a single
tap when you are already on the home screen? In iPhone firmware 2.2 a
single tap returns the user back to the first page of the home screen.
That’s right, if you are one of those people that have pages and pages
of apps, one click brings you right back to see your SMS and other
favorite apps, no more finger swipe mania! Double tapping the home
button acts as it did before allowing you to choose to go to your
phone favorites or iPod.

Here’s a breakdown of everything that has been confirmed in the new
firmware after the jump:


App Store

* New category icons: An icon now appears next to each category
name. The icon is of an app that is currently in the store that
represents that category. The app icon Apple chooses to display next
to the category also changes sporadically, surely in only a way that
Apple can understand.
* Sorting within categories: Now when a user enters a category,
he will be able to sort the apps by “Top Paid,” “Top Free,” and
“Release Date.” Currently the apps only appear in order of release
date, so this will be a nice change for users looking to find quality
within a category.
* Multiple Screenshots: Users will now be able to see all the
screenshots of an application, just like they can on the desktop
iTunes rather than being limited to just one picture in the app
store.
* Report a Problem: Have a problem with an application? Does it
have a bug? Is it offensive? If so one click can send the note right
to the developer.

Podcasts

So what’s going on with Podcasts? well as previously reported , there
is a sexy new button on the iTunes tab bar that gives users the
ability to download podcasts directly from their iPhone.

* Both video and audio podcasts will be available for download
* Over-the-Air downloads on AT&T’s Edge and 3G networks (limit of
10MB)
* No file size limit when downloading over WiFi

Safari

It’s hard to improve on a good thing, so Safari will see very few
changes. The only confirmed change worth noting is the new newly
designed user interface to it’s address bar.

* The address bar on the top of the screen has been split into two
sections. Most of the space displays the URL, while the new section
contains room for a google search. When either area is clicked, the
view expands to the full size while the keyboard is displayed. It
matches the style Safari uses on the desktop, and makes the Google
search much more visible.

Maps

* Street View: Google street view is most likely the most highly
reported feature coming to the new firmware. iPhone users will now be
able to get the same view that was highly publicized for Android
Phones.

* Walking Directions: No car, no problem. Users will be able to
choose to get walking directions,the time estimates even change to
accommodate the slower mode of transportation. This is really handy
in crowded cities with one-way roads that don’t impact the walkers.

* Public Transportation: Find your way using only public
transit! Maps now offers directions and combines different means of
public transportation to get you to your destination. A true treat to
someone in a new city and with no rental car.

* Location Sharing: Maps now makes it a snap to send your current
location, or any other location to anyone you want via email. Launch
maps, drop a pin and simply email anyone you choose. If you receive a
location it launches your maps application and lets you directions
directly. So what’s the point of Loopt again?

Other Improvements

* Support for Audio Line-in: The headphone jack will be able to
take accessories that will allow users to record anything they wish,
including real instruments.
* Auto-Correction settings: This feature can now be turned off
for those of us who have mastered the iPhone keypad.
* Support for new languages
* Rating System: Also, as previously reported, the new rating
system will be implemented in 2.2. The rating system will prompt app
users to give a rating upon deleting an app, a questionable system.
It’s hard to image any user giving anything other than a 1 star rating
after DELETING an app.

Now, don’t worry, we haven’t forgotten about the emoticons, however,
it’s still unclear if they will actually be included in the update and
we cannot confirm they will be there as of this time. Something almost
not worth mentioning is that now when you forget your voicemail
password, you will be prompted to call AT&T… I recommend skipping this
process and using the Direct Line app to get through.

I see there still is no MMS, Copy and paste, etc. All things people are
asking for. No, they give you shit they want.

The number one requested thing was MMS. Almost a tie with copy and paste.
Once again, Apple gives you things they want, not what people want.
Larry
2008-11-21 01:55:30 UTC
Permalink
iPhone 3Gold <***@gmail.com> wrote in news:072f7add-d4ee-4fcf-a2a2-
***@k36g2000yqe.googlegroups.com:

> we cannot confirm they will be there as of this time

No cut and paste....................................shit!
4phun
2008-11-21 04:23:22 UTC
Permalink
updated 52 minutes ago

Obama's cell phone records breached

In an internal company e-mail obtained by CNN, Verizon Wireless
President and CEO Lowell McAdam disclosed Wednesday that "the personal
wireless account of President-elect Barack Obama had been accessed by
employees not authorized to do so" in recent months.

Good old Verizon...
Larry
2008-11-21 04:54:55 UTC
Permalink
4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote in news:ef7750d0-90d8-4dbf-81a4-
***@j38g2000yqa.googlegroups.com:

>
> updated 52 minutes ago
>
> Obama's cell phone records breached
>
> In an internal company e-mail obtained by CNN, Verizon Wireless
> President and CEO Lowell McAdam disclosed Wednesday that "the personal
> wireless account of President-elect Barack Obama had been accessed by
> employees not authorized to do so" in recent months.
>
> Good old Verizon...
>

All landline phone records for every call you make from your home phone are
stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal. Noone seems to find that
interesting except me, it seems.....

I'm crazy. I don't think ANY records of what Americans do should be
allowed to cross our borders.
Bob Haar
2008-11-21 11:05:27 UTC
Permalink
On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:

> All landline phone records for every call you make from your home phone are
> stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal. Noone seems to find that
> interesting except me, it seems.....

Please provide reputable sources for this. Or did you forget to wear your
tin foil helmet?

> I'm crazy.

OK.
Larry
2008-11-21 17:20:56 UTC
Permalink
Bob Haar <***@comcast.net> wrote in
news:C54C0027.434EBF%***@comcast.net:

> On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:
>
>> All landline phone records for every call you make from your home
>> phone are stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal. Noone
>> seems to find that interesting except me, it seems.....
>
> Please provide reputable sources for this. Or did you forget to wear
> your tin foil helmet?
>
>> I'm crazy.
>
> OK.
>
>

http://www.williambowles.info/spysrus/israel_spies.html

Fox News good enough for you? Here's the transcript.

geez.....idiot

Company is called Amdocs
Todd Allcock
2008-11-21 21:29:53 UTC
Permalink
At 21 Nov 2008 17:20:56 +0000 Larry wrote:

> > OK.
> >
> >
>
> http://www.williambowles.info/spysrus/israel_spies.html
>
> Fox News good enough for you? Here's the transcript.
>
> geez.....idiot
>
> Company is called Amdocs

Yep, a large international, publically-traded company headquartered in
Mossad-controlled Missouri. It's founders and current CEO are Israelli-
youhave that part right.

While many American Telecommunications companies are clients, so is China
Mobile. If the Chinese think their call records are safe with Amdocs, I
doubt we have anything to worry about.

Ever wonder why Fox pulled all references to that report from their website
and never reaired it? Maybe it was the pressure from those Missouri
Illuminati Jews?
iPhone 3Gold
2008-11-21 21:39:24 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 21, 12:20 pm, Larry <***@home.com> wrote:
> Bob Haar <***@comcast.net> wrote innews:C54C0027.434EBF%***@comcast.net:
>
> > On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:
>
> >> All landline phone records for every call you make from your home
> >> phone are stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal.  Noone
> >> seems to find that interesting except me, it seems.....
>
> > Please provide reputable sources for this. Or did you forget to wear
> > your tin foil helmet?
>
> >> I'm crazy.  
>
> > OK.
>
> http://www.williambowles.info/spysrus/israel_spies.html
>
> Fox News good enough for you?  Here's the transcript.
>
> geez.....idiot
>
> Company is called Amdocs

Larry I already knew your post was accurate. I think it was quite a
scandal buried by the religious fanatics in government.

http://letmegooglethatforyou.com/?q=Israeli+Spy+Ring

Lets start using those free Google tutorial links for those who do not
know how to use Google.

Anyone can verify a post using a good search engine.

Teach them how one person at a time!
4phun
2008-11-21 22:56:53 UTC
Permalink
In addition to adding features like Street View on Google Maps and
performance improvements that could reduce the number of dropped
calls, the latest software update for the iPhone released on Friday
also plugs holes that could expose data on locked phones.

The update plugs a hole that lets someone with physical access to a
passcode-locked device to launch applications ...

http://letmegooglethatforyou.com/?q=iPhone+update+makes+device+far+more+secure
U***@postedOnline.ltd
2008-11-22 02:59:28 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 14:56:53 -0800 (PST), 4phun <***@gmail.com>
wrote:

>In addition to adding features like Street View on Google Maps and
>performance improvements that could reduce the number of dropped
>calls, the latest software update for the iPhone released on Friday
>also plugs holes that could expose data on locked phones.
>
>The update plugs a hole that lets someone with physical access to a
>passcode-locked device to launch applications ...
>
>http://letmegooglethatforyou.com/?q=iPhone+update+makes+device+far+more+secure

More crap from Apple; the iPhone star has crashed once again.
Todd Allcock
2008-11-22 22:29:13 UTC
Permalink
"4phun" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:ed0f247f-c217-4a37-9bca-***@u14g2000yqg.googlegroups.com...
> In addition to adding features like Street View on Google Maps and
> performance improvements that could reduce the number of dropped
> calls, the latest software update for the iPhone released on Friday
> also plugs holes that could expose data on locked phones.
>
> The update plugs a hole that lets someone with physical access to a
> passcode-locked device to launch applications ...

Yeah, that's the hole that was discovered in August. There's no more
telling way for Apple to demonstrate if the iPhone is ready for the
Enterprise than to take three months to issue an update to fix such a simple
problem. Maybe that Google "Street View" took longer than they expected...

> http://letmegooglethatforyou.com/?q=iPhone+update+makes+device+far+more+secure

Yet as always...

http://blogs.computerworld.com/apple_iphone_2_2_update_fixes_issues_causes_others

Not picking on Apple in particular, in this case- this stuff seems to be
common with all tech products recently. The REAL problem with
user-updatable products is that there seems to be no real incentive for
manufacturers to get it all working right the first time. Bliss is always
just around the corner with the NEXT update! ;-)
4phun
2008-11-22 23:12:54 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 22, 5:29 pm, "Todd Allcock" <***@AnoOspamL.com> wrote:
> "4phun" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:ed0f247f-c217-4a37-9bca-***@u14g2000yqg.googlegroups.com...
>
> > In addition to adding features like Street View on Google Maps and
> > performance improvements that could reduce the number of dropped
> > calls, the latest software update for the iPhone released on Friday
> > also plugs holes that could expose data on locked phones.
>
> > The update plugs a hole that lets someone with physical access to a
> > passcode-locked device to launch applications ...
>
> Yeah, that's the hole that was discovered in August.  There's no more
> telling way for Apple to demonstrate if the iPhone is ready for the
> Enterprise than to take three months to issue an update to fix such a simple
> problem.  Maybe that Google "Street View" took longer than they expected...
>
> >http://letmegooglethatforyou.com/?q=iPhone+update+makes+device+far+mo...
>
> Yet as always...
>
> http://blogs.computerworld.com/apple_iphone_2_2_update_fixes_issues_c...
>
> Not picking on Apple in particular, in this case- this stuff seems to be
> common with all tech products recently.  The REAL problem with
> user-updatable products is that there seems to be no real incentive for
> manufacturers to get it all working right the first time.  Bliss is always
> just around the corner with the NEXT update!  ;-)

Apple fixed 12 security holes not one with this release. Would you
want 12 releases or wait for just one if you were IT?
Todd Allcock
2008-11-23 07:48:48 UTC
Permalink
At 22 Nov 2008 15:12:54 -0800 4phun wrote:


> Apple fixed 12 security holes not one with this release. Would you
> want 12 releases or wait for just one if you were IT?


That depends how serious the holes were, doesn't it? ;-)

I suspect IT's real answer would be not to let such a device have access to
the network in the first place...
4phun
2008-11-25 03:35:47 UTC
Permalink
Why iPhone Killers Are Good For The iPhone...
Posted Mon, 11/24/2008 - 19:49 by mobicipc

Every time the next iPhone killer is launched with much fanfare, I
have a feeling Steve Jobs is raising a toast to it. While the Google
Android based G1 is a fairly decent attempt, RIM's BlackBerry Storm
simply misses the point. Almost every reviewer mentions that the Storm
felt comfortable after they figured out how to use it. These reviewers
are the geeks among geeks, and if it took them a while to figure it
out, it will take the average Joe just a little bit longer.

Enterprise Joe Average Joe

Much has been said about the lack of Enterprise features on the
iPhone. But it is still selling like hot cakes. If it is not the
enterprise user buying iPhones, who is? Say hello to the average Joe.
The average Joe (or Jane for that matter) doesn't care about
enterprise VPN support. What he cares about is ease of use, cool
factor, and the opposite of laziness - i.e. Joe wants to chat, follow
the news, play music, check email or play a game, and in the middle of
it all, take a a phone call and continue playing right after - if the
device puts up as much as a single stumbling block as Joe moves from
this to that to this in less than two minutes, Joe gives up and picks
up a magazine. The average Joe is young, impatient and can easily find
other things to do. That is where the iPhone scores the heaviest.

Reviewers seem to constantly focus on why the iPhone doesn't measure
up for the enterprise user. It is way too simple. It doesn't have as
much controls. It is not good enough for good old enterprise Joe. Now,
that piques the average Joe's interest. May be it will just work for
me. If that drives Joe to a store to check it out, the cool factor
wins him over and he falls hook, line and sinker for it. Steve and the
nice folks in Apple know this. That is why they pay lip service to the
enterprise Joe - hey, we'll accommodate you, to the extent we can -
and really really focus on making that 2 mins of average Joe's time
feel that much more special. Let the RIMs and Microsoft's bite off
more than they can chew. Apple will continue to nibble away mouthfuls
of the market from the opposite end of the pie. Wait and see who ends
up with the bigger slice at the end.
Elmo P. Shagnasty
2008-11-25 11:22:15 UTC
Permalink
In article
<58a743b4-42e1-403e-999d-***@a12g2000yqm.googlegroups.com>,
4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:

> The average Joe is young, impatient and can easily find
> other things to do. That is where the iPhone scores the heaviest.

So what you're saying is that the iPhone is for the ADHD population.
Ron
2008-11-25 12:58:06 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 25 Nov 2008 06:22:15 -0500, "Elmo P. Shagnasty"
<***@nastydesigns.com> wrote:

>In article
><58a743b4-42e1-403e-999d-***@a12g2000yqm.googlegroups.com>,
> 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> The average Joe is young, impatient and can easily find
>> other things to do. That is where the iPhone scores the heaviest.
>
>So what you're saying is that the iPhone is for the ADHD population.


Arent we all somewhat ADHD? Otherwise we'd all still be on Dialup with
AOL.
Elmo P. Shagnasty
2008-11-25 13:24:14 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>,
Ron <***@peoplepc.com> wrote:

> >> The average Joe is young, impatient and can easily find
> >> other things to do. That is where the iPhone scores the heaviest.
> >
> >So what you're saying is that the iPhone is for the ADHD population.
>
>
> Arent we all somewhat ADHD? Otherwise we'd all still be on Dialup with
> AOL.

Nope. That our preferences change is natural. That they change every
minute is not natural.
That80sGuy
2008-11-21 19:40:55 UTC
Permalink
In message news:C54C0027.434EBF%***@comcast.net, Bob Haar
<***@comcast.net> done wrote:

> On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:
>
>> All landline phone records for every call you make from your home
>> phone are stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal. Noone
>> seems to find that interesting except me, it seems.....
>
> Please provide reputable sources for this.

Google this:

"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
Ron
2008-11-25 12:57:02 UTC
Permalink
On 21 Nov 2008 19:40:55 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:

>In message news:C54C0027.434EBF%***@comcast.net, Bob Haar
><***@comcast.net> done wrote:
>
>> On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:
>>
>>> All landline phone records for every call you make from your home
>>> phone are stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal. Noone
>>> seems to find that interesting except me, it seems.....
>>
>> Please provide reputable sources for this.
>
>Google this:
>
>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs


Always a Hamas shill in every Newsgroup
That80sGuy
2008-11-25 12:59:46 UTC
Permalink
In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
<***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:

> On 21 Nov 2008 19:40:55 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>
>>In message news:C54C0027.434EBF%***@comcast.net, Bob Haar
>><***@comcast.net> done wrote:
>>
>>> On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> All landline phone records for every call you make from your home
>>>> phone are stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal. Noone
>>>> seems to find that interesting except me, it seems.....
>>>
>>> Please provide reputable sources for this.
>>
>>Google this:
>>
>>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>
>
> Always a Hamas shill in every Newsgroup

Are you claiming Cameron did not do a report on Amdocs and other Israeli
companies? Are you claiming that wasn't a FOUR PART report? Are you
claiming that FOX News with Brit Hume did not air it?

Just what facts do you have on your side? Because I say you have none.
Ron
2008-11-25 13:56:24 UTC
Permalink
On 25 Nov 2008 12:59:46 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:

>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>
>> On 21 Nov 2008 19:40:55 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>
>>>In message news:C54C0027.434EBF%***@comcast.net, Bob Haar
>>><***@comcast.net> done wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> All landline phone records for every call you make from your home
>>>>> phone are stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal. Noone
>>>>> seems to find that interesting except me, it seems.....
>>>>
>>>> Please provide reputable sources for this.
>>>
>>>Google this:
>>>
>>>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>>
>>
>> Always a Hamas shill in every Newsgroup
>
>Are you claiming Cameron did not do a report on Amdocs and other Israeli
>companies? Are you claiming that wasn't a FOUR PART report? Are you
>claiming that FOX News with Brit Hume did not air it?
>
>Just what facts do you have on your side? Because I say you have none.


Just because the CEO is Israeli, hardly makes the company an agent of
the Israeli Government. GET REAL.
That80sGuy
2008-11-25 15:49:32 UTC
Permalink
In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
<***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:

> On 25 Nov 2008 12:59:46 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>
>>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
>><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>>
>>> On 21 Nov 2008 19:40:55 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>>In message news:C54C0027.434EBF%***@comcast.net, Bob Haar
>>>><***@comcast.net> done wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> All landline phone records for every call you make from your home
>>>>>> phone are stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal. Noone
>>>>>> seems to find that interesting except me, it seems.....
>>>>>
>>>>> Please provide reputable sources for this.
>>>>
>>>>Google this:
>>>>
>>>>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>>>
>>>
>>> Always a Hamas shill in every Newsgroup
>>
>>Are you claiming Cameron did not do a report on Amdocs and other Israeli
>>companies? Are you claiming that wasn't a FOUR PART report? Are you
>>claiming that FOX News with Brit Hume did not air it?
>>
>>Just what facts do you have on your side? Because I say you have none.
>
>
> Just because the CEO is Israeli, hardly makes the company an agent of
> the Israeli Government. GET REAL.

Ah, so now acknowledging that his primary thesis was blown out of the
water, and that he has no rebuttal to the facts, he attempts weakly to move
the goalposts.

Once again, Google this:

"Carl Cameron" Amdocs

The links between Amdocs (and Comverse as well) and the Israeli government
and the IDF are strong, clear, and well-documented.

P.S.: Another Israel-firster, Rahm Israel Emanuel, at least had the courage
to go over there and volunteer with the IDF. Why isn't your coward ass
over there too?
Ron
2008-11-25 16:43:59 UTC
Permalink
On 25 Nov 2008 15:49:32 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:

>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>
>> On 25 Nov 2008 12:59:46 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>
>>>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
>>><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 21 Nov 2008 19:40:55 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>In message news:C54C0027.434EBF%***@comcast.net, Bob Haar
>>>>><***@comcast.net> done wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> All landline phone records for every call you make from your home
>>>>>>> phone are stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal. Noone
>>>>>>> seems to find that interesting except me, it seems.....
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Please provide reputable sources for this.
>>>>>
>>>>>Google this:
>>>>>
>>>>>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Always a Hamas shill in every Newsgroup
>>>
>>>Are you claiming Cameron did not do a report on Amdocs and other Israeli
>>>companies? Are you claiming that wasn't a FOUR PART report? Are you
>>>claiming that FOX News with Brit Hume did not air it?
>>>
>>>Just what facts do you have on your side? Because I say you have none.
>>
>>
>> Just because the CEO is Israeli, hardly makes the company an agent of
>> the Israeli Government. GET REAL.
>
>Ah, so now acknowledging that his primary thesis was blown out of the
>water, and that he has no rebuttal to the facts, he attempts weakly to move
>the goalposts.
>
>Once again, Google this:
>
>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>
>The links between Amdocs (and Comverse as well) and the Israeli government
>and the IDF are strong, clear, and well-documented.
>
>P.S.: Another Israel-firster, Rahm Israel Emanuel, at least had the courage
>to go over there and volunteer with the IDF. Why isn't your coward ass
>over there too?


I dont see you in the Gaza strip with your Hamas buddies.
That80sGuy
2008-11-25 16:57:15 UTC
Permalink
In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
<***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:

> On 25 Nov 2008 15:49:32 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>
>>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
>><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>>
>>> On 25 Nov 2008 12:59:46 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
>>>><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On 21 Nov 2008 19:40:55 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>In message news:C54C0027.434EBF%***@comcast.net, Bob Haar
>>>>>><***@comcast.net> done wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> All landline phone records for every call you make from your
>>>>>>>> home phone are stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal.
>>>>>>>> Noone seems to find that interesting except me, it seems.....
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Please provide reputable sources for this.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Google this:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Always a Hamas shill in every Newsgroup
>>>>
>>>>Are you claiming Cameron did not do a report on Amdocs and other
>>>>Israeli companies? Are you claiming that wasn't a FOUR PART report?
>>>>Are you claiming that FOX News with Brit Hume did not air it?
>>>>
>>>>Just what facts do you have on your side? Because I say you have
>>>>none.
>>>
>>>
>>> Just because the CEO is Israeli, hardly makes the company an agent of
>>> the Israeli Government. GET REAL.
>>
>>Ah, so now acknowledging that his primary thesis was blown out of the
>>water, and that he has no rebuttal to the facts, he attempts weakly to
>>move the goalposts.
>>
>>Once again, Google this:
>>
>>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>>
>>The links between Amdocs (and Comverse as well) and the Israeli
>>government and the IDF are strong, clear, and well-documented.
>>
>>P.S.: Another Israel-firster, Rahm Israel Emanuel, at least had the
>>courage to go over there and volunteer with the IDF. Why isn't your
>>coward ass over there too?
>
>
> I dont see you in the Gaza strip with your Hamas buddies.

Cite a post where I expressed support for Hamas.
Ron
2008-11-25 17:55:16 UTC
Permalink
On 25 Nov 2008 16:57:15 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:

>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>
>> On 25 Nov 2008 15:49:32 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>
>>>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
>>><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 25 Nov 2008 12:59:46 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
>>>>><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On 21 Nov 2008 19:40:55 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>In message news:C54C0027.434EBF%***@comcast.net, Bob Haar
>>>>>>><***@comcast.net> done wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> All landline phone records for every call you make from your
>>>>>>>>> home phone are stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal.
>>>>>>>>> Noone seems to find that interesting except me, it seems.....
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Please provide reputable sources for this.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Google this:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Always a Hamas shill in every Newsgroup
>>>>>
>>>>>Are you claiming Cameron did not do a report on Amdocs and other
>>>>>Israeli companies? Are you claiming that wasn't a FOUR PART report?
>>>>>Are you claiming that FOX News with Brit Hume did not air it?
>>>>>
>>>>>Just what facts do you have on your side? Because I say you have
>>>>>none.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Just because the CEO is Israeli, hardly makes the company an agent of
>>>> the Israeli Government. GET REAL.
>>>
>>>Ah, so now acknowledging that his primary thesis was blown out of the
>>>water, and that he has no rebuttal to the facts, he attempts weakly to
>>>move the goalposts.
>>>
>>>Once again, Google this:
>>>
>>>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>>>
>>>The links between Amdocs (and Comverse as well) and the Israeli
>>>government and the IDF are strong, clear, and well-documented.
>>>
>>>P.S.: Another Israel-firster, Rahm Israel Emanuel, at least had the
>>>courage to go over there and volunteer with the IDF. Why isn't your
>>>coward ass over there too?
>>
>>
>> I dont see you in the Gaza strip with your Hamas buddies.
>
>Cite a post where I expressed support for Hamas.


This whole thread whre you spout the Hamas line that everything wrong
in the world is the fault of Israel.
That80sGuy
2008-11-25 18:04:31 UTC
Permalink
In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
<***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:

> On 25 Nov 2008 16:57:15 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>
>>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
>><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>>
>>> On 25 Nov 2008 15:49:32 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
>>>><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On 25 Nov 2008 12:59:46 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
>>>>>><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 21 Nov 2008 19:40:55 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>In message news:C54C0027.434EBF%***@comcast.net, Bob Haar
>>>>>>>><***@comcast.net> done wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> All landline phone records for every call you make from your
>>>>>>>>>> home phone are stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal.
>>>>>>>>>> Noone seems to find that interesting except me, it seems.....
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Please provide reputable sources for this.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Google this:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Always a Hamas shill in every Newsgroup
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Are you claiming Cameron did not do a report on Amdocs and other
>>>>>>Israeli companies? Are you claiming that wasn't a FOUR PART report?
>>>>>>Are you claiming that FOX News with Brit Hume did not air it?
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Just what facts do you have on your side? Because I say you have
>>>>>>none.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Just because the CEO is Israeli, hardly makes the company an agent of
>>>>> the Israeli Government. GET REAL.
>>>>
>>>>Ah, so now acknowledging that his primary thesis was blown out of the
>>>>water, and that he has no rebuttal to the facts, he attempts weakly to
>>>>move the goalposts.
>>>>
>>>>Once again, Google this:
>>>>
>>>>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>>>>
>>>>The links between Amdocs (and Comverse as well) and the Israeli
>>>>government and the IDF are strong, clear, and well-documented.
>>>>
>>>>P.S.: Another Israel-firster, Rahm Israel Emanuel, at least had the
>>>>courage to go over there and volunteer with the IDF. Why isn't your
>>>>coward ass over there too?
>>>
>>>
>>> I dont see you in the Gaza strip with your Hamas buddies.
>>
>>Cite a post where I expressed support for Hamas.
>
>
> This whole thread whre you spout the Hamas line that everything wrong
> in the world is the fault of Israel.

This thread is about Amdocs. Hamas has never said anything about Amdocs.
That80sGuy
2008-11-25 18:25:20 UTC
Permalink
In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
<***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:

> On 25 Nov 2008 16:57:15 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>
>>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
>><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>>
>>> On 25 Nov 2008 15:49:32 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
>>>><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On 25 Nov 2008 12:59:46 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>In message news:***@4ax.com, Ron
>>>>>><***@peoplepc.com> done wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 21 Nov 2008 19:40:55 GMT, That80sGuy <***@griswold.com> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>In message news:C54C0027.434EBF%***@comcast.net, Bob Haar
>>>>>>>><***@comcast.net> done wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> On 11/20/08 11:54 PMNov 20, "Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> All landline phone records for every call you make from your
>>>>>>>>>> home phone are stored by a company run by the Mossad in Isreal.
>>>>>>>>>> Noone seems to find that interesting except me, it seems.....
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Please provide reputable sources for this.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Google this:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Always a Hamas shill in every Newsgroup
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Are you claiming Cameron did not do a report on Amdocs and other
>>>>>>Israeli companies? Are you claiming that wasn't a FOUR PART report?
>>>>>>Are you claiming that FOX News with Brit Hume did not air it?
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Just what facts do you have on your side? Because I say you have
>>>>>>none.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Just because the CEO is Israeli, hardly makes the company an agent of
>>>>> the Israeli Government. GET REAL.
>>>>
>>>>Ah, so now acknowledging that his primary thesis was blown out of the
>>>>water, and that he has no rebuttal to the facts, he attempts weakly to
>>>>move the goalposts.
>>>>
>>>>Once again, Google this:
>>>>
>>>>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs
>>>>
>>>>The links between Amdocs (and Comverse as well) and the Israeli
>>>>government and the IDF are strong, clear, and well-documented.
>>>>
>>>>P.S.: Another Israel-firster, Rahm Israel Emanuel, at least had the
>>>>courage to go over there and volunteer with the IDF. Why isn't your
>>>>coward ass over there too?
>>>
>>>
>>> I dont see you in the Gaza strip with your Hamas buddies.
>>
>>Cite a post where I expressed support for Hamas.
>
>
> This whole thread whre you spout the Hamas line that everything wrong
> in the world is the fault of Israel.

I stated that Carl Cameron did a 4-part report on Amdocs and Comverse. You
were unable to refute my statement because my statement is true.

I stated that Fox News with Brit Hume aired Cameron's report. You were
unable to refute my statement because my statement is true.

I stated that links between Amdocs and Comverse and the Israeli government
and military are stron, clear and well-documented. You were unable to
refute my statement because my statement is true.

I stated that Rahm Israel Emanuel, Barack Obama's chief-of-staff,
volunteered with the Israeli Defense Force. You were unable to refute my
statement because my statement is true.

Thus you have resorted to a specious and dishonest attempt at "guilt-by-
association" by squealing "Hamas! Hamas!" like a pathetic little girl.
Your argument is of the same logical construct as saying that "I like
carrots. Hitler liked carrots. Therefore I am Hitler."
Todd Allcock
2008-11-25 15:57:26 UTC
Permalink
At 25 Nov 2008 12:59:46 +0000 That80sGuy wrote:

> >>Google this:
> >>
> >>"Carl Cameron" Amdocs


Ironically, the first link that Google generates is an article discrediting
Cameron's story for it's inaccuracies and bias...

> > Always a Hamas shill in every Newsgroup
>
> Are you claiming Cameron did not do a report on Amdocs and other Israeli
> companies? Are you claiming that wasn't a FOUR PART report? Are you
> claiming that FOX News with Brit Hume did not air it?
>
> Just what facts do you have on your side? Because I say you have none.


No, I think he's suggesting Cameron's story was full of crap, and it was
pulled from Fox News' website when Fox was challenged on it's veracity.
Again, just the quote from the report that Amdocs is a "private Israeli-
based telecommunications company" is incorrect, and seems designed just to
anger folks like, well, Larry. Anyone who wants a piece of this "private"
company can do so by buying it on the NYSE; symbol DOX.
News
2008-11-21 12:15:00 UTC
Permalink
4phun wrote:

> updated 52 minutes ago
>
> Obama's cell phone records breached
>
> In an internal company e-mail obtained by CNN, Verizon Wireless
> President and CEO Lowell McAdam disclosed Wednesday that "the personal
> wireless account of President-elect Barack Obama had been accessed by
> employees not authorized to do so" in recent months.
>
> Good old Verizon...



Good old McCain campaign bundler VRZN Chairman Ivan Seidenberg....
Ron
2008-11-22 01:18:38 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 20 Nov 2008 20:23:22 -0800 (PST), 4phun <***@gmail.com>
wrote:

>
>updated 52 minutes ago
>
>Obama's cell phone records breached
>
>In an internal company e-mail obtained by CNN, Verizon Wireless
>President and CEO Lowell McAdam disclosed Wednesday that "the personal
>wireless account of President-elect Barack Obama had been accessed by
>employees not authorized to do so" in recent months.
>
>Good old Verizon...


I'm old enough for this to sound just like the Watergate Breakin,
where they were lookin for info on the Democrats. This time someone
likely had the ideas they'd find all of Obama's phone calls to William
Ayers. They didnt find any so the story didnt come out till now.
Bet they'll find some Verizon employee works for the White House
Plumbers.
News
2008-11-22 02:44:26 UTC
Permalink
Ron wrote:

> On Thu, 20 Nov 2008 20:23:22 -0800 (PST), 4phun <***@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>>updated 52 minutes ago
>>
>>Obama's cell phone records breached
>>
>>In an internal company e-mail obtained by CNN, Verizon Wireless
>>President and CEO Lowell McAdam disclosed Wednesday that "the personal
>>wireless account of President-elect Barack Obama had been accessed by
>>employees not authorized to do so" in recent months.
>>
>>Good old Verizon...
>
>
>
> I'm old enough for this to sound just like the Watergate Breakin,
> where they were lookin for info on the Democrats. This time someone
> likely had the ideas they'd find all of Obama's phone calls to William
> Ayers. They didnt find any so the story didnt come out till now.
> Bet they'll find some Verizon employee works for the White House
> Plumbers.


Maybe, but we know for sure they work for Ivan Seidenberg.
Larry
2008-11-22 05:06:00 UTC
Permalink
News <***@Group.name> wrote in news:6N6dnUeBr-
***@speakeasy.net:

> Maybe, but we know for sure they work for Ivan Seidenberg.
>
>

Is he Irish Catholic??
4phun
2008-11-22 06:51:06 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 22, 12:06 am, Larry <***@home.com> wrote:
> News <***@Group.name> wrote in news:6N6dnUeBr-
> ***@speakeasy.net:
>
> > Maybe, but we know for sure they work for Ivan Seidenberg.
>
> Is he Irish Catholic??

Like Kennedy and Cohen?

I worked for that firm and it was Jewish from the get go. The name was
cleverly selected to mislead the public. A typical tactic in certain
circles.
Larry
2008-11-22 19:17:15 UTC
Permalink
4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote in news:2194d1fb-1fc7-4d10-81b7-
***@j32g2000yqn.googlegroups.com:

> On Nov 22, 12:06 am, Larry <***@home.com> wrote:
>> News <***@Group.name> wrote in news:6N6dnUeBr-
>> ***@speakeasy.net:
>>
>> > Maybe, but we know for sure they work for Ivan Seidenberg.
>>
>> Is he Irish Catholic??
>
> Like Kennedy and Cohen?
>
> I worked for that firm and it was Jewish from the get go. The name was
> cleverly selected to mislead the public. A typical tactic in certain
> circles.
>
>

That describes most of the retail storefronts in any shopping center.....

If you get bored, do some research on Google of who controls the top of ANY
Federal bureaucracy. They are all totally infiltrated by people with DUAL
citizenship. Which flag do they really salute? I think it should be
forbidden, just like it is for President. Noone can really think Henry
Kissinger works for US.
c***@nym.hush.com
2008-11-22 21:47:16 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 19:17:15 +0000, Larry <***@home.com> wrote:

>4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote in news:2194d1fb-1fc7-4d10-81b7-
>***@j32g2000yqn.googlegroups.com:
>
>> On Nov 22, 12:06 am, Larry <***@home.com> wrote:
>>> News <***@Group.name> wrote in news:6N6dnUeBr-
>>> ***@speakeasy.net:
>>>
>>> > Maybe, but we know for sure they work for Ivan Seidenberg.
>>>
>>> Is he Irish Catholic??
>>
>> Like Kennedy and Cohen?
>>
>> I worked for that firm and it was Jewish from the get go. The name was
>> cleverly selected to mislead the public. A typical tactic in certain
>> circles.
>>
>>
>
>That describes most of the retail storefronts in any shopping center.....
>
>If you get bored, do some research on Google of who controls the top of ANY
>Federal bureaucracy. They are all totally infiltrated by people with DUAL
>citizenship. Which flag do they really salute? I think it should be
>forbidden, just like it is for President. Noone can really think Henry
>Kissinger works for US.

I saw a documentary about that.

Israel is the only country that the USA allows to have/maintain dual
citizenship = passports. USA & Israel

Strange but true.
News
2008-11-22 21:49:58 UTC
Permalink
***@nym.hush.com wrote:
> On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 19:17:15 +0000, Larry <***@home.com> wrote:
>
>
>>4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote in news:2194d1fb-1fc7-4d10-81b7-
>>***@j32g2000yqn.googlegroups.com:
>>
>>
>>>On Nov 22, 12:06 am, Larry <***@home.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>>News <***@Group.name> wrote in news:6N6dnUeBr-
>>>>***@speakeasy.net:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Maybe, but we know for sure they work for Ivan Seidenberg.
>>>>
>>>>Is he Irish Catholic??
>>>
>>>Like Kennedy and Cohen?
>>>
>>>I worked for that firm and it was Jewish from the get go. The name was
>>>cleverly selected to mislead the public. A typical tactic in certain
>>>circles.
>>>
>>>
>>
>>That describes most of the retail storefronts in any shopping center.....
>>
>>If you get bored, do some research on Google of who controls the top of ANY
>>Federal bureaucracy. They are all totally infiltrated by people with DUAL
>>citizenship. Which flag do they really salute? I think it should be
>>forbidden, just like it is for President. Noone can really think Henry
>>Kissinger works for US.
>
>
> I saw a documentary about that.
>
> Israel is the only country that the USA allows to have/maintain dual
> citizenship = passports. USA & Israel
>
> Strange but true.


If you ignore Switzerland....
Todd Allcock
2008-11-22 23:40:29 UTC
Permalink
At 22 Nov 2008 21:47:16 +0000 ***@nym.hush.com wrote:
> > They are all totally infiltrated by people with DUAL
> >citizenship. Which flag do they really salute? I think it should be
> >forbidden, just like it is for President. Noone can really think Henry
> >Kissinger works for US.
>
> I saw a documentary about that.
>
> Israel is the only country that the USA allows to have/maintain dual
> citizenship = passports. USA & Israel
>
> Strange but true.


It would indeed be strange, if it were true...

...but it isn't.

Under US law, there is no prohibition from having multiple nation's
passports or holding dual-citizenship, as long as all requirements for US
citizenship are met.

I humbly submit Exhibit A; from the website of our own State Department :

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1753.html

[All use of capitalization for emphasis is mine]

"The concept of dual nationality means that a person is a citizen of two
countries at the same time. Each country has its own citizenship laws based
on its own policy...

"... a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it MAY
lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires
that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free
choice, and WITH THE INTENTION TO GIVE UP U.S. CITIZENSHIP.

"...Most U.S. citizens, including dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport
to enter and leave the United States. Dual nationals may also be required
by the foreign country to use its passport to enter and leave that country.
Use of the foreign passport DOES NOT ENDANGER U.S. CITIZENSHIP..."

So, hopefully another ridiculous myth "proving" Israel secretly controls
the US Goverment can fall by the wayside...? Nah, I didn't think so...
Larry
2008-11-23 01:46:05 UTC
Permalink
Todd Allcock <***@AnoOspamL.com> wrote in news:gga5bh$93u$4
@aioe.org:

> So, hopefully another ridiculous myth "proving" Israel secretly controls
> the US Goverment can fall by the wayside...? Nah, I didn't think so...
>
>

The very inordinate percentage of Jews at the top of every government
agency in positions of absolute control is no accident and no secret. It's
been that way for decades.

Every one of them is an Israeli citizen....and potential spy.

http://www.antiwar.com/justin/?articleid=3469

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article7545.htm

http://pedulipalestina.blogspot.com/2008/08/israel-spies-on-us-what-
special.html

http://www.rense.com/general18/EIRblowsisraeli.htm

http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2007/11/018964.php


And, please, don't any of you forget my dead shipmates:
http://www.gtr5.com/
This was no accident......
s***@rogers.com
2008-11-23 00:39:08 UTC
Permalink
>
> Israel is the only country that the USA allows to have/maintain dual
> citizenship = passports.  USA & Israel

No, not true. That's a widely held misconception. A US citizen can,
in fact, hold dual citizenship with any other country, subject to any
restrictions that the other country may have on dual citizenship.
Larry
2008-11-23 01:36:22 UTC
Permalink
***@nym.hush.com wrote in news:bcvgi4dgeir77cka5ggpha48laj37uh9s8@
4ax.com:

> I saw a documentary about that.
>
> Israel is the only country that the USA allows to have/maintain dual
> citizenship = passports. USA & Israel
>
> Strange but true.
>
>

Not strange at all once you consider which small minority controls the
media exposure and MONEY of the country.....

Mayer Rothchild, a Jew himself, put it:
"Give me control of a nation's money supply and I care NOT who makes its
laws."

That's as true today as it was when he said it...a long time ago.
c***@nym.hush.com
2008-11-23 03:49:09 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 23 Nov 2008 01:36:22 +0000, Larry <***@home.com> wrote:

>***@nym.hush.com wrote in news:bcvgi4dgeir77cka5ggpha48laj37uh9s8@
>4ax.com:
>
>> I saw a documentary about that.
>>
>> Israel is the only country that the USA allows to have/maintain dual
>> citizenship = passports. USA & Israel
>>
>> Strange but true.
>>
>>
>
>Not strange at all once you consider which small minority controls the
>media exposure and MONEY of the country.....
>
>Mayer Rothchild, a Jew himself, put it:
>"Give me control of a nation's money supply and I care NOT who makes its
>laws."
>
>That's as true today as it was when he said it...a long time ago.

So if the Jews are in control of the money in the USA, how come they let the
economy go in the cellar? What was their payoff?
News
2008-11-23 04:17:32 UTC
Permalink
***@nym.hush.com wrote:
> On Sun, 23 Nov 2008 01:36:22 +0000, Larry <***@home.com> wrote:
>
>
>>***@nym.hush.com wrote in news:bcvgi4dgeir77cka5ggpha48laj37uh9s8@
>>4ax.com:
>>
>>
>>>I saw a documentary about that.
>>>
>>>Israel is the only country that the USA allows to have/maintain dual
>>>citizenship = passports. USA & Israel
>>>
>>>Strange but true.
>>>
>>>
>>
>>Not strange at all once you consider which small minority controls the
>>media exposure and MONEY of the country.....
>>
>>Mayer Rothchild, a Jew himself, put it:
>>"Give me control of a nation's money supply and I care NOT who makes its
>>laws."
>>
>>That's as true today as it was when he said it...a long time ago.
>
>
> So if the Jews are in control of the money in the USA, how come they let the
> economy go in the cellar? What was their payoff?


Were they short?
Larry
2008-11-23 05:14:40 UTC
Permalink
***@nym.hush.com wrote in
news:***@4ax.com:

> So if the Jews are in control of the money in the USA, how come they
> let the economy go in the cellar? What was their payoff?
>
>

In past depressions, history repeating itself, the big bankers create
panic and a run on the banks. Banks, like you read almost every day
now, start failing because of our "fractional reserve banking" system,
where the deposits are only a tiny fraction of the actual money the
banks loan out, money made out of thin air on computers these days.
Strapped for cash and headed for disaster, keep an eye on the lackeys at
FDIC making deals with the BIG bankers (like Wells-Fargo buying up
Wachovia for pennies on the dollar) to buy their failing bank for a tiny
fraction of the failing bank's previous net worth. The big bankers just
got bigger, repeating the scam over and over. The NUMBER of banks
depositors and borrowers can now do business with SHRINKS, making the
coffers of the survivors, those big boys at the top like the
Rockefellers, Rothchilds, the old banking families, expand
exponentially. It was done in 1921, 1929, and many smaller times since.
The cycle is repeating itself, now. Ask Wachovia, Washington Mutual,
etc.

New scams, however, much more profitable, have emerged! We get our
politicians we've been carefully feeding money to called "campaign
contributions" to pass a law to borrow vast sums of money from US, the
Federal Reserve Private Bank Corporation, owned by the big bankers...at
interest, of course, payable to US, the big bankers....and loan, or more
correctly hand out, money to the little banks WE JUST BOUGHT, calling it
a "bailout"! How delightful! We make money loaning it to the stupids
and they give it back to us to loan out to more stupids, who become our
debt SLAVES, the whole idea in the first place....DEBT is SLAVERY.

They didn't "let" the economy do anything.....THEY CAUSED IT! This time
the cause was Lehman Brothers (former symbol LEH), who, DING!, are
JEWS...loads of Jews! How convenient!

Got the idea, yet? YOU'VE BEEN HAD!....

Maybe you should watch Aaron Russo's fantastic documentary film on
YouTube called:
"America - Freedom to Fascism"
Check it out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ueEfRXZCVA
start here and watch all 11 parts in proper sequence. The next part is
a clicker under the movie. Most enlightening....especially about the
IRS, used to extract the INTEREST from the workers illegally.

You might also want to watch an explanation of our fake banking system
in 5 parts starting at:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cy-fD78zyvI

Those who don't think media is controlled by the shadow government, like
the Council on Foreign Relations, need to watch:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrGNNZnz8EI

Then, you'll want to watch:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPU8w7Bxc0A

If you haven't seen the FULL 2 hour Zeitgeist movie, you also need to
watch how the public has and is controlled by DEBT, government in DEBT
and the myth of religion, all religions.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kHhc67GopM

A second movie has been added to UPDATE the Zeitgeist movie to the new
2008 realities that have revealed themselves in even more recent times.
That movie, in full, is available on:
http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=zeitgeist+addendum&emb=0&aq=1
&oq=Zeit#

Of course, fully brainwashed by your education, your media, your
patriotism, you'll find all this distasteful and rebel against it. But,
just a tiny bit, try to open your mind and relate what you see on these
videos to what you experience in your life. If it even makes you
question your previous programming, you're on your way to true freedom.
Freedom from religion. Freedom from media. Freedom from government
control. If found out, a place is being made to prevent you infecting
others with this conspiracy nonsense:
http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=Camp+indiana&emb=0&aq=f#
You didn't think FEMA was for you, did you?
George Kerby
2008-11-23 17:45:57 UTC
Permalink
On 11/22/08 11:14 PM, in article ***@74.209.131.13,
"Larry" <***@home.com> wrote:

> ***@nym.hush.com wrote in
> news:***@4ax.com:
>
>> So if the Jews are in control of the money in the USA, how come they
>> let the economy go in the cellar? What was their payoff?
>>
>>
>
> In past depressions, history repeating itself, the big bankers create
> panic and a run on the banks. Banks, like you read almost every day
> now, start failing because of our "fractional reserve banking" system,
> where the deposits are only a tiny fraction of the actual money the
> banks loan out, money made out of thin air on computers these days.
> Strapped for cash and headed for disaster, keep an eye on the lackeys at
> FDIC making deals with the BIG bankers (like Wells-Fargo buying up
> Wachovia for pennies on the dollar) to buy their failing bank for a tiny
> fraction of the failing bank's previous net worth. The big bankers just
> got bigger, repeating the scam over and over. The NUMBER of banks
> depositors and borrowers can now do business with SHRINKS, making the
> coffers of the survivors, those big boys at the top like the
> Rockefellers, Rothchilds, the old banking families, expand
> exponentially. It was done in 1921, 1929, and many smaller times since.
> The cycle is repeating itself, now. Ask Wachovia, Washington Mutual,
> etc.
>
> New scams, however, much more profitable, have emerged! We get our
> politicians we've been carefully feeding money to called "campaign
> contributions" to pass a law to borrow vast sums of money from US, the
> Federal Reserve Private Bank Corporation, owned by the big bankers...at
> interest, of course, payable to US, the big bankers....and loan, or more
> correctly hand out, money to the little banks WE JUST BOUGHT, calling it
> a "bailout"! How delightful! We make money loaning it to the stupids
> and they give it back to us to loan out to more stupids, who become our
> debt SLAVES, the whole idea in the first place....DEBT is SLAVERY.
>
> They didn't "let" the economy do anything.....THEY CAUSED IT! This time
> the cause was Lehman Brothers (former symbol LEH), who, DING!, are
> JEWS...loads of Jews! How convenient!
>
> Got the idea, yet? YOU'VE BEEN HAD!....
>
> Maybe you should watch Aaron Russo's fantastic documentary film on
> YouTube called:
> "America - Freedom to Fascism"
> Check it out:
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ueEfRXZCVA
> start here and watch all 11 parts in proper sequence. The next part is
> a clicker under the movie. Most enlightening....especially about the
> IRS, used to extract the INTEREST from the workers illegally.
>
> You might also want to watch an explanation of our fake banking system
> in 5 parts starting at:
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cy-fD78zyvI
>
> Those who don't think media is controlled by the shadow government, like
> the Council on Foreign Relations, need to watch:
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrGNNZnz8EI
>
> Then, you'll want to watch:
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPU8w7Bxc0A
>
> If you haven't seen the FULL 2 hour Zeitgeist movie, you also need to
> watch how the public has and is controlled by DEBT, government in DEBT
> and the myth of religion, all religions.
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kHhc67GopM
>
> A second movie has been added to UPDATE the Zeitgeist movie to the new
> 2008 realities that have revealed themselves in even more recent times.
> That movie, in full, is available on:
> http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=zeitgeist+addendum&emb=0&aq=1
> &oq=Zeit#
>
> Of course, fully brainwashed by your education, your media, your
> patriotism, you'll find all this distasteful and rebel against it. But,
> just a tiny bit, try to open your mind and relate what you see on these
> videos to what you experience in your life. If it even makes you
> question your previous programming, you're on your way to true freedom.
> Freedom from religion. Freedom from media. Freedom from government
> control. If found out, a place is being made to prevent you infecting
> others with this conspiracy nonsense:
> http://video.google.com/videosearch?q=Camp+indiana&emb=0&aq=f#
> You didn't think FEMA was for you, did you?
>
>
Lotsa coffee at The Waffle House today, eh Larry?
anon
2008-11-23 14:33:37 UTC
Permalink
***@nym.hush.com wrote:

> Israel is the only country that the USA allows to have/maintain dual
> citizenship = passports. USA & Israel
>
> Strange but true.

Not true. USA/Canada
Ron
2008-11-23 15:02:12 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 23 Nov 2008 09:33:37 -0500, anon <***@anon.org> wrote:

>***@nym.hush.com wrote:
>
>> Israel is the only country that the USA allows to have/maintain dual
>> citizenship = passports. USA & Israel
>>
>> Strange but true.
>
>Not true. USA/Canada


Instead of silly arguments, Just read the facts, not the rant of an
anti-Israeli loon.

http://www.richw.org/dualcit/law.html
Larry
2008-11-22 05:05:01 UTC
Permalink
Ron <***@peoplepc.com> wrote in
news:***@4ax.com:

> I'm old enough for this to sound just like the Watergate Breakin,
> where they were lookin for info on the Democrats. This time someone
> likely had the ideas they'd find all of Obama's phone calls to William
> Ayers. They didnt find any so the story didnt come out till now.
> Bet they'll find some Verizon employee works for the White House
> Plumbers.
>
>

Nonsense, the usual elitist cults like CFR, Trilateral Commission,
Bilderbergers, Illuminati, have been grooming Obama just like they groomed
Clinton to be president since he was in college. More evidence came out to
support this theory today.

Hillary is about as qualified as Joe the Plumber to be Sec of State

The Federal Reserve Private Bank Corporation elite have installed one of
their own employees to make sure the Treasury Department is fully
infiltrated, just like always.

Nothing has changed. The bankers are still in control of the gummit, same
as always.

I did find it amusing how the real wall street "experts" were just bubbling
on business TV talking about how the NY Fed President was a government
leader to the masses on American TV, which none of them can possibly be
that stupid and still hold a major sheepskin from an elite university....

The same old debt slavery scheme the gummit has run on with PLANNED
recessions and DEPRESSIONS to reset the system for more inflation to keep
the debt machine well oiled since 1913 is running as it always has....

....history repeating itself....boom, bust, recession, depression, more
wars, boom, bust, recession, depression, more wars...
Todd Allcock
2008-11-22 22:37:55 UTC
Permalink
"Ron" <***@peoplepc.com> wrote in message
news:***@4ax.com...

>>In an internal company e-mail obtained by CNN, Verizon Wireless
>>President and CEO Lowell McAdam disclosed Wednesday that "the personal
>>wireless account of President-elect Barack Obama had been accessed by
>>employees not authorized to do so" in recent months.
>>
>>Good old Verizon...
>
>
> I'm old enough for this to sound just like the Watergate Breakin,
> where they were lookin for info on the Democrats. This time someone
> likely had the ideas they'd find all of Obama's phone calls to William
> Ayers. They didnt find any so the story didnt come out till now.
> Bet they'll find some Verizon employee works for the White House
> Plumbers.

Oh, please! And James Carville was behind the hacking of Sarah Palin's
email... I think "Conspiracy Theory" Larry is starting to rub off on you...

This is far more likely a case of an employee abusing their tiny, little
power where someone with celebrity status is involved, like the hacking
Paris Hilton's Sidekick on T-Mobile a few years ago, or IRS employees
looking at celebrities' (or ex-spouses) tax returns to see how much they
reported earning.

"Duuuude... check this out- I just found Obama's account! Check it out..."

"Cool... D'ja think Jessica Alba's on Verizon? I'll bet she sends some
WILD picture messages..."
Todd Allcock
2008-11-22 18:46:43 UTC
Permalink
At 20 Nov 2008 14:48:28 -0500 Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

> I work for a Fortune 100 company that by and large uses Blackberries,
> but any employee is free to use his own phone. Awhile back they told
> everyone exactly what steps to go through to hook the iPhone up to the
> corporate system, to get BB-style functionality.
>
> And by "they told everyone," I mean they ADVERTISED it. It's not a
> hidden "you have to know whom to call" thing.
>
> It seems our IT infrastructure truly is one of support, not one of
> prescribing how any of 50,000 people must do something.


To be fair, your company is the exception rather than the rule. Many are
more restrictive, and I suspect that's dependent on security concerns- i.e.
can the device be remote-wiped if lost, can the on-device security be
circumvented easily by "power users", etc.

My wife works for the Feds, and after one too many "stolen/missing laptop"
scandles on the news, went security crazy. They had already required
Blackberries only for mobile access (but you could use your personal one,
if you chose), but then they also locked down laptop use by requiring RSA
keyfobs or cards (random password generators that issue new passwords once
a MINUTE) to access their Exchange server anywhere outside the government
WAN.
Elmo P. Shagnasty
2008-11-22 20:55:10 UTC
Permalink
In article <gg9k40$p7t$***@aioe.org>,
Todd Allcock <***@AnoOspamL.com> wrote:

> > It seems our IT infrastructure truly is one of support, not one of
> > prescribing how any of 50,000 people must do something.
>
>
> To be fair, your company is the exception rather than the rule. Many are
> more restrictive, and I suspect that's dependent on security concerns- i.e.
> can the device be remote-wiped if lost, can the on-device security be
> circumvented easily by "power users", etc.
>
> My wife works for the Feds, and after one too many "stolen/missing laptop"
> scandles on the news, went security crazy. They had already required
> Blackberries only for mobile access (but you could use your personal one,
> if you chose), but then they also locked down laptop use by requiring RSA
> keyfobs or cards (random password generators that issue new passwords once
> a MINUTE) to access their Exchange server anywhere outside the government
> WAN.

We've had the RSA cards forever, too. That a gov't agency is just now
getting around to that, surprises me.
That80sGuy
2008-11-22 21:59:15 UTC
Permalink
In message news:elmop-***@mara100-84.onlink.net, "Elmo P.
Shagnasty" <***@nastydesigns.com> done wrote:

> We've had the RSA cards forever, too. That a gov't agency is just now
> getting around to that, surprises me.

The government isn't accountable, so why would it care? When tainted meat
hits the food chain, how many FDA inspectors get fired?
Todd Allcock
2008-11-22 23:08:13 UTC
Permalink
At 22 Nov 2008 15:55:10 -0500 Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

> > To be fair, your company is the exception rather than the rule. Many
are
> > more restrictive, and I suspect that's dependent on security concerns-
i.e.
> > can the device be remote-wiped if lost, can the on-device security be
> > circumvented easily by "power users", etc.
> >
> > My wife works for the Feds, and after one too many "stolen/missing
laptop"
> > scandles on the news, went security crazy. They had already required
> > Blackberries only for mobile access (but you could use your personal one,

> > if you chose), but then they also locked down laptop use by requiring
RSA
> > keyfobs or cards (random password generators that issue new passwords
once
> > a MINUTE) to access their Exchange server anywhere outside the
government
> > WAN.
>
> We've had the RSA cards forever, too. That a gov't agency is just now
> getting around to that, surprises me.


I suspect is it was a cost issue- for all the talk about government waste
and $500 hammers, my wife's agency still runs many of their PCs on Windows
2000 and Office 2k2!

Until the RSA cards/fobs were issued (early this year, IIRC) they relied
soley on password protection and forced monthly password changes. To
discourage (but not prohibit) the use of OWA, they now have to reenter an
RSA code every 15 minutes online. Prior to this recent change, they only
had to enter the code at the beginning of a web session. My wife's attitute,
(like many others', I suspect,) was "F--- this, I'll just wait until I'm in
the office!", lowering the productivity of the (probably very small number
of!) Federal Employes diligent enough to actually work on their own time!
;-)
Larry
2008-11-23 01:33:29 UTC
Permalink
Todd Allcock <***@AnoOspamL.com> wrote in news:gga5be$93u$2
@aioe.org:

> lowering the productivity of the (probably very small number
> of!) Federal Employes

Lowering the productivity of Federal Employees saves taxpayers billions in
raised taxes.

It was estimated if we closed the Federal Government ONE day, the savings
in paper ALONE would amount to over $800M plus 12,000 acres of trees.
Jishnu Mukerji
2008-11-22 21:19:45 UTC
Permalink
Todd Allcock wrote:
> requiring RSA
> keyfobs or cards (random password generators that issue new passwords once
> a MINUTE) to access their Exchange server anywhere outside the government
> WAN.

Been using variants of those for almost 6 years now. What were these
government agencies using? Just plain passwords over open network
connections? Are they nuts?
Todd Allcock
2008-11-22 23:13:54 UTC
Permalink
At 22 Nov 2008 16:19:45 -0500 Jishnu Mukerji wrote:
> Todd Allcock wrote:
> > requiring RSA
> > keyfobs or cards (random password generators that issue new passwords
once
> > a MINUTE) to access their Exchange server anywhere outside the
government
> > WAN.
>
> Been using variants of those for almost 6 years now. What were these
> government agencies using? Just plain passwords over open network
> connections? Are they nuts?


No, open passwords over a 56k dial-up VPN connection to a LAN in
Washington. This change (using RSA security) allowed them to use WiFi
connections instead of dialup when on the road. Nothing tries your
patience like opening, editing, and resaving a 2MB Powerpoint on a remote
server from a flakey dialup connection in rural South Dakota! ;-)
iPhone 3Gold
2008-11-20 21:44:45 UTC
Permalink
Cnet's Take on BlackBerry's Storm

The gloomier forecast

But the Storm isn't a perfect device either. And there are a few
things that I prefer on the iPhone. For one, the Storm lacks Wi-Fi.
Verizon Wireless' representatives told me they opted not to include Wi-
Fi because it adds "bulk, cost, and is a drain on the battery."

{ boo! Ha Ha if you are dumb enough to believe that.

Verizon's hand can not be in your pocket it you are using WiFi instead
of WZN.

The whole point of Verizon is to make as much as they can off any of
their captive suckers.

Verizon even charges $10 a month for the Storm to use that built in
GPS. }

But truth be told, I think Verizon didn't want Wi-Fi because the
company would rather have customers surf its 3G wireless network.
While 3G speeds are a huge improvement over 2.5G speeds, they simply
don't hold a candle to Wi-Fi. I can download e-mails and Web pages on
my iPhone when using Wi-Fi much faster than when I am using AT&T's 3G
network. And I can't imagine it would be much different on Verizon's
3G network.

Beyond its lack of Wi-Fi, I'd say that I prefer the touch screen
navigation and Web browsing experience on the iPhone to the Storm.
This of course, is a matter of personal taste. The new BlackBerry
browser is slick and it works well. It's definitely a huge improvement
over its older browsers. But zooming in on pages on the Storm requires
clicking a button or actually clicking the screen. And I prefer the
iPhone's pinching and brushing movements. But that's just me.

--
{ Bottom line, there is still nothing like an iPhone for the folks
stuck with Verizon. But the Storm is cooler than all that other crap
Verizon has. }

CNET CONCLUDES

Let's face it, Verizon's previous attempts at introducing a so-called
iPhone kliller have been lackluster. The LG Voyager and the LG Dare,
looked cool and sleek, but they weren't true smartphones. RIM's other
BlackBerry models have lacked the touch screen and cool factor.

Even though Verizon has not seen huge numbers of its subscribers leave
its network since the iPhone was first introduced a year and a half
ago, it has lost some as a result. But now, customers who are
satisfied with Verizon Wireless's coverage and network reliability,
won't have to leave to get a really cool device.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-10103056-94.html


On Nov 20, 6:40 am, 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> BlackBerry's Storm: Awkward and Disappointing
> Research in Motion's BlackBerry Storm looks handsome enough, but it
> will disappoint prospective buyers hoping for a credible touch-based
> iPhone alternative.
>
> Yardena Arar, PC World
> Nov 20, 2008 12:01 am
>
> BlackBerry fans who've been yearning for a touch-based handset à la
> iPhone now have one, but the BlackBerry Storm--which Verizon Wireless
> plans to start selling Friday for $250 with a two-year contract--might
> not be the smart phone of their dreams.
>
> The decision by Research in Motion to differentiate the Storm by
> giving its capacitive touch screen a mechanical component (the entire
> screen functions as a button for confirming selections or initiating
> actions) turns out to be more confusing than helpful. Ultimately, the
> Storm's touch interface feels like a failed experiment.
>
> It's too bad, because the Storm has some nice features and makes a
> great first impression. Encased in shiny black with silvery accents on
> the front and a removable matte metal cover in the back, the Storm is
> shorter, slightly narrower, and somewhat thicker than the iPhone--not
> surprising since it packs support for Verizon Wireless's fastest
> network (EvDO Rev. A), for quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE, and for 2100-MHz
> UMTS/HSPA networks, enabling overseas roaming on the fastest networks
> available. The Storm also has a GPS receiver and Bluetooth, but no Wi-
> Fi.
>
> <Snip>
>
> A Disappointing Touch
>
> The touch-screen interface differentiates the Storm from its RIM
> brethren--and there I was disappointed.
>
> <snip>
>
> Click to Type
>
> Typing on the Storm isn't much fun, either. You have to click the
> screen keyboard for each keystroke (the keys flash blue under your
> fingertips as you click), which ends up feeling like a lot of work in
> a way that typing on a hardware keyboard (or on the iPhone's software
> keyboard, for that matter) never did. I worry, too, about how well the
> mechanics of the click screen will hold up under the pressure of
> continual use by heavy typers.
>
> There's no obvious way to make the keyboard go away quickly, either,
> if you want to see part of the screen that it's concealing.
>
> <snip>
>
> But people who were hoping for a credible iPhone alternative fortified
> with BlackBerry's strengths as a mobile tool for corporate travelers
> will likely find the Storm a disappointment. When it comes to touch
> interfaces, Apple still has no peer.
>
> [Even before seeing the BlackBerry Storm, some journalists had
> reservations about it. Read a list of reasons to pick the iPhone over
> the Storm by Al Sacco of our sister publication, CIO.]
>
> http://www.pcworld.com/printable/article/id,154212/printable.html
iPhone 3Gold
2008-11-20 22:54:51 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 20, 4:44 pm, iPhone 3Gold <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> Cnet's Take on BlackBerry's Storm
>
> The gloomier forecast
>
> But the Storm isn't a perfect device either. And there are a few
> things that I prefer on the iPhone. For one, the Storm lacks Wi-Fi.
> Verizon Wireless' representatives told me they opted not to include Wi-
> Fi because it adds "bulk, cost, and is a drain on the battery."

BusinessWeek panned all the new BlackBerrys today.
--

Review: New BlackBerrys cool but can't beat iPhone

By RACHEL METZ
More from BusinessWeek


NEW YORK

BusinessWeek concludes that best of the Rimm lot, was the BlackBerry
Bold 9000, which will be on the same AT&T network as the iPhone.

RIMM to AT&T?

"No garbage for you, we'll save it for Verizon and T-Mobile." ;>)
Todd Allcock
2008-11-20 23:18:00 UTC
Permalink
At 20 Nov 2008 13:44:45 -0800 iPhone 3Gold wrote:

> Verizon Wireless' representatives told me they opted not to include Wi-
> Fi because it adds "bulk, cost, and is a drain on the battery."
>
> { boo! Ha Ha if you are dumb enough to believe that.


Why not? All the iPhone 2G buyers were dumb enough to believe that iPhones
didn't have 3G because 3G eats batteries! ;-)

> Verizon's hand can not be in your pocket it you are using WiFi instead
> of WZN.


Verizon fixed that last week. They now require all smartphone owners to
carry a $30 data plan, a move pioneered by AT&T and Apple. Coincidentally,
the recently released smartphones (i.e. Samsung Saga) suddenly include WiFi!


> The whole point of Verizon is to make as much as they can off any of
> their captive suckers.

Hmmm, how's that required data plan on your iPhone 3G treating you? Or T-
Mo' required data and text plan on the Google phone? Another iPhone
"first" everyone is copying.
Kevin Weaver
2008-11-21 00:33:21 UTC
Permalink
"iPhone 3Gold" <***@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:5b8d37ab-797e-497e-a0c7-***@j35g2000yqh.googlegroups.com...
Cnet's Take on BlackBerry's Storm

The gloomier forecast

But the Storm isn't a perfect device either. And there are a few
things that I prefer on the iPhone. For one, the Storm lacks Wi-Fi.
Verizon Wireless' representatives told me they opted not to include Wi-
Fi because it adds "bulk, cost, and is a drain on the battery."

{ boo! Ha Ha if you are dumb enough to believe that.

Verizon's hand can not be in your pocket it you are using WiFi instead
of WZN.

The whole point of Verizon is to make as much as they can off any of
their captive suckers.

Verizon even charges $10 a month for the Storm to use that built in
GPS. }

But truth be told, I think Verizon didn't want Wi-Fi because the
company would rather have customers surf its 3G wireless network.
While 3G speeds are a huge improvement over 2.5G speeds, they simply
don't hold a candle to Wi-Fi. I can download e-mails and Web pages on
my iPhone when using Wi-Fi much faster than when I am using AT&T's 3G
network. And I can't imagine it would be much different on Verizon's
3G network.

Beyond its lack of Wi-Fi, I'd say that I prefer the touch screen
navigation and Web browsing experience on the iPhone to the Storm.
This of course, is a matter of personal taste. The new BlackBerry
browser is slick and it works well. It's definitely a huge improvement
over its older browsers. But zooming in on pages on the Storm requires
clicking a button or actually clicking the screen. And I prefer the
iPhone's pinching and brushing movements. But that's just me.

--
{ Bottom line, there is still nothing like an iPhone for the folks
stuck with Verizon. But the Storm is cooler than all that other crap
Verizon has. }

CNET CONCLUDES

Let's face it, Verizon's previous attempts at introducing a so-called
iPhone kliller have been lackluster. The LG Voyager and the LG Dare,
looked cool and sleek, but they weren't true smartphones. RIM's other
BlackBerry models have lacked the touch screen and cool factor.

Even though Verizon has not seen huge numbers of its subscribers leave
its network since the iPhone was first introduced a year and a half
ago, it has lost some as a result. But now, customers who are
satisfied with Verizon Wireless's coverage and network reliability,
won't have to leave to get a really cool device.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-10103056-94.html


On Nov 20, 6:40 am, 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> BlackBerry's Storm: Awkward and Disappointing
> Research in Motion's BlackBerry Storm looks handsome enough, but it
> will disappoint prospective buyers hoping for a credible touch-based
> iPhone alternative.
>
> Yardena Arar, PC World
> Nov 20, 2008 12:01 am
>
> BlackBerry fans who've been yearning for a touch-based handset à la
> iPhone now have one, but the BlackBerry Storm--which Verizon Wireless
> plans to start selling Friday for $250 with a two-year contract--might
> not be the smart phone of their dreams.
>
> The decision by Research in Motion to differentiate the Storm by
> giving its capacitive touch screen a mechanical component (the entire
> screen functions as a button for confirming selections or initiating
> actions) turns out to be more confusing than helpful. Ultimately, the
> Storm's touch interface feels like a failed experiment.
>
> It's too bad, because the Storm has some nice features and makes a
> great first impression. Encased in shiny black with silvery accents on
> the front and a removable matte metal cover in the back, the Storm is
> shorter, slightly narrower, and somewhat thicker than the iPhone--not
> surprising since it packs support for Verizon Wireless's fastest
> network (EvDO Rev. A), for quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE, and for 2100-MHz
> UMTS/HSPA networks, enabling overseas roaming on the fastest networks
> available. The Storm also has a GPS receiver and Bluetooth, but no Wi-
> Fi.
>
> <Snip>
>
> A Disappointing Touch
>
> The touch-screen interface differentiates the Storm from its RIM
> brethren--and there I was disappointed.
>
> <snip>
>
> Click to Type
>
> Typing on the Storm isn't much fun, either. You have to click the
> screen keyboard for each keystroke (the keys flash blue under your
> fingertips as you click), which ends up feeling like a lot of work in
> a way that typing on a hardware keyboard (or on the iPhone's software
> keyboard, for that matter) never did. I worry, too, about how well the
> mechanics of the click screen will hold up under the pressure of
> continual use by heavy typers.
>
> There's no obvious way to make the keyboard go away quickly, either,
> if you want to see part of the screen that it's concealing.
>
> <snip>
>
> But people who were hoping for a credible iPhone alternative fortified
> with BlackBerry's strengths as a mobile tool for corporate travelers
> will likely find the Storm a disappointment. When it comes to touch
> interfaces, Apple still has no peer.
>
> [Even before seeing the BlackBerry Storm, some journalists had
> reservations about it. Read a list of reasons to pick the iPhone over
> the Storm by Al Sacco of our sister publication, CIO.]
>
> http://www.pcworld.com/printable/article/id,154212/printable.html

Why did they put in Wi-Fi into the iphone ? To keep users off the 3G thats
why. Try to dl a app or updates thru 3G. :) Your going to get a message
telling you nope can't happen. Connect thru Wi-Fi and try again. So that
unlimited plan has limits when using 3G. Little small apps sometimes can be
got from the 3G but a major amount of them won't.
4phun
2008-11-21 00:55:57 UTC
Permalink
November 20, 2008 3:47 PM PST

Palm losing out as iPhone gains corporate fans
Posted by Tom Krazit




The Palm Treo 750, Palm's flagship product the last time it was a
major player in corporate smartphones almost two years ago.


Perhaps no one has benefited as much from the downfall of the Treo
than Apple.

On Thursday, ChangeWave released the results of an otherwise dismal
survey predicting a tough time ahead for anyone who relies on
corporate IT spending for their livelihood. But the news was good for
those in the smartphone business not named Palm; smartphone shipments
to U.S. corporations are expected to grow even as overall IT spending
falls.

And Apple's iPhone is seeing the bulk of the growth, according to
ChangeWave. Companies still love Research in Motion's BlackBerry, but
the iPhone is picking up ground.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-10104639-37.html
Todd Allcock
2008-11-21 01:02:10 UTC
Permalink
"Kevin Weaver" <***@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:llnVk.8832$***@nlpi066.nbdc.sbc.com...

> Why did they put in Wi-Fi into the iphone ? To keep users off the 3G thats
> why. Try to dl a app or updates thru 3G. :) Your going to get a message
> telling you nope can't happen. Connect thru Wi-Fi and try again. So that
> unlimited plan has limits when using 3G. Little small apps sometimes can
> be got from the 3G but a major amount of them won't.

Based on the error messages on my wife's iPhone, the app size limit seems to
be 10MB before the device demands a Wifi connection.

Oddly, that seems to be hardcoded in the firmware, rather than a
network-generated error. My wife's phone is unlocked and on T-Mobile, so it
should be immune to any AT&T network-generated restrictions. In contrast,
back when I used the $6/month "T-Mobile Web" data plan (which like the AT&T
iPhone plan is "unlimited") it was the T-Mo network itself that blocked
access- (attempting to download files over 950k, regardless of what phone
was used, resulted in a "network error." The sole exception was e-mail
attachments which could be larger.)
Todd Allcock
2008-11-18 19:13:02 UTC
Permalink
At 18 Nov 2008 09:40:14 -0800 4phun wrote:
> This is the first step to true and accurate voice recognition and
> translation:
>
> 1) Google user speaks search string into phone.
>
> 2) Google gets it wrong, user corrects Google
>
> 3) Multiply by millions of searches daily with constant correction and
> feedback from users
>
> 4) Perfect voice rec, major profit
>
> There will be a few issues with voice recognition to begin with but as
> it gets better and more people use the service and add to the database
> with their corrections and add to the pool of variable accents etc the
> accuracy will be perfected at an exponential rate.


Perhaps, but only in a spell-checker sort of way. The system will simulate
increased accuracy by replacing non-understood inputwith likely
possibilities based on things most people have searched for, in an "80/20
rule" methodology, "correcting" seldom used search terms you might have
actually wanted, into more popular ones you didn't. (I.e. a query for
"Seratonin" might return "Sarah Palin", since the latter currently gets far
more hits than the former.)


> A similar concept could apply to translations. Once voice recognition
> is perfected and becomes the primary search input of choice then more
> people will be able to use their phones as direct voice to voice
> translators. Obvious translation mistakes will become apparent through
> mass use. At every turn users could flag apparent mistranslations and
> through the help of the Google Borg accurate translations would
> evolve. Much the same way that Wikipedia pages tend to accuracy over
> time even with the input of a subset of "disruptive" users.


True, which will be state of the art until mobile devices get enough power
to handle speech recognition on-board instead of relying on a server. On-
board processing will allow the accuracy to evolve based on YOUR input alone,
rather than the input of the entire "herd" of users.
4phun
2008-11-18 20:01:43 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 18, 2:13 pm, Todd Allcock <***@AnoOspamL.com> wrote:
> At 18 Nov 2008 09:40:14 -0800 4phun wrote:
>
>
>
> > This is the first step to true and accurate voice recognition and
> > translation:
>
>
> Perhaps, but only in a spell-checker sort of way.  The system will simulate
> increased accuracy by replacing non-understood inputwith likely
> possibilities based on things most people have searched for, in an "80/20
> rule" methodology, "correcting" seldom used search terms you might have
> actually wanted, into more popular ones you didn't.  (I.e. a query for
> "Seratonin" might return "Sarah Palin", since the latter currently gets far
> more hits than the former.)
>

Ha Ha this is a hoot!

I tried Todds example and found there is no such word. As Google
instantly came back with Serotonin not Seratonin or "Sarah Palin".

I even keyed it in exactly as Todd spelled it to double check - same
result!

Todd you need Google Voice Mobile too for fast accurate results. :>)

I just searched for the cure for a cold and mailed the results to
myself to explore on the PC.
Larry
2008-11-18 05:34:28 UTC
Permalink
4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote in news:11865e54-dff1-4551-84d2-
***@w1g2000prk.googlegroups.com:

> To bad, so sad, if you can't have it!
>
> ;>)
>
>
>

How about a Japanese language robot controlled from any place on the planet
from Skype for free?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qn1767PvMk8

Way cool....(c;
nospam
2008-11-17 18:06:18 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>, Ron
<***@peoplepc.com> wrote:

> Your snipping the link proving Continental did it last year in 2007,
> doesnt make AA first.

i *said* aa wasn't first, so there was no need to keep the link, and in
my other reply, i specifically mentioned continental doing it before
aa. i also said it had nothing to do with iphones and actually sounds
like more of a pain than using a piece of paper. sometimes low tech is
the best solution.
Jishnu Mukerji
2008-11-20 13:38:58 UTC
Permalink
nospam wrote:
> In article <***@4ax.com>, Ron
> <***@peoplepc.com> wrote:
>
>> Your snipping the link proving Continental did it last year in 2007,
>> doesnt make AA first.
>
> i *said* aa wasn't first, so there was no need to keep the link, and in
> my other reply, i specifically mentioned continental doing it before
> aa. i also said it had nothing to do with iphones and actually sounds
> like more of a pain than using a piece of paper. sometimes low tech is
> the best solution.

I agree that passing through TSA can be a pain if they insist on seeing
your boarding card immediately following the metal detector. Otherwise
it is fine. Notwithstanding that, I found it quite convenient to use at
the boarding gate at which point my iPhone (or any other phone with a
display) is readily available anyway.
iPhone 3Gold
2008-11-18 16:39:39 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 18, 12:32 am, Larry <***@home.com> wrote:
> 4phun <***@gmail.com> wrote in news:11865e54-dff1-4551-84d2-
> ***@w1g2000prk.googlegroups.com:
>
> > To bad, so sad, if you can't have it!
>
> > ;>)
>
> You stupid ass.  The rest of us have had voice recognition and key entry
> for YEARS.  Where you been...oh, up Apple's ass, right.
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOf1XQyxyHU
>
> It works on Google.....IT WORKS ON EVERYTHING!
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1tt_aeIAM8
> Tazti works really good....but just EATS CPU.
> Listen to the very end....it's for mobiles!

To bad, so sad, you can't have it Larry!

All that have tried Google Voice including myself say this is light
years further down the road of Speech Recognition, and it is only on
the iPhone. It is a fun app just to use and very entertaining as well
as practical. And of course it doesn't run on Symbian or Mameo.

To bad, so sad
You can't have it!

Boo Woo Who Ha Ha
Todd Allcock
2008-11-18 18:55:42 UTC
Permalink
At 18 Nov 2008 08:39:39 -0800 iPhone 3Gold wrote:


> To bad, so sad, you can't have it Larry!
>
> All that have tried Google Voice including myself say this is light
> years further down the road of Speech Recognition, and it is only on
> the iPhone. It is a fun app just to use and very entertaining as well
> as practical. And of course it doesn't run on Symbian or Mameo.


To be fair, how long do you think it'll be before "every" phone has it?
The speech recognition is handled by Google's servers, not your phone.
Essentially all the iPhone is doing is recording a snippet of sound,
uploading it (along with your position) and waiting for Google to offer up
results- it's the search engine version of "Shazam."

Any device with a microphone, browser, and internet access can do this, but
Google knows what the press loves to write about. If they launched this
service for Motorola RAZRs first, no one would be talking about it! ;-)
(As evidence of this, MS put similar server-based VR in Windows Live Search
almost a year ago, but I don't recall seeing any press touting it.)
Ironically, while WLS' VR is limited to navigation-related searches (streets,
business names, categories like restaurants, hotels, shopping, etc.)
virtually every example in the articles and blogs quoted here were
location/lookup related and would've been valid searches in WLS (San
Fransisco pizza restaurants, Indian take-away, nearest Apple store, Camp
"Ukeliele", etc.)

Google's VR seems works about the same as the Windows Live Search VR (the
more you're willing to embarrass yourself by talking like a robot, the more
accurate it gets!)



> To bad, so sad
> You can't have it!
>
> Boo Woo Who Ha Ha


I've had (most of) it since February or so, IIRC, on WLS (WinMo's "killer
app," if there is one) but rarely use it unless conditions don't allow more
accurate input methods (like while driving.)

I suspect Google will toss this at Android next, followed by a Java version
then eventually WinMo, Blackberry, etc. native versions. The advantage to
Google of making it an app, is this allows them to become a search engine
of choice on any phone regardless of what search engine the cellco defaults
their phones' browsers to. (I.e. T-Mo places a Yahoo search bar on their
WAP home page. Many dumbphones have no easy way to change a home page, so
users will generally just use it, rather than going through additional work
to get to a different engine. However, consumers might select a Google VR
search app instead of launching the WAP browser.)
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